Amanda Arnold

Correspondent

  • Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Amanda Arnold is a Forbes Travel Guide correspondent based in Atlanta. Arnold likes to give readers the inside scoop about some of the world’s most gorgeous hotels and tastiest eateries. She has worked at Discovery Communications, where she edited and composed pieces for its many websites, including TLC.com, Discovery.com and Howstuffworks.com. When it comes to her own travels, she’s game for either outdoorsy excursions (kayaking in Grand Teton) or luxury boutique stays (in the French Riviera, please!) — or better yet, one trip that includes a little of both.

  • On April 9, 2013
  • On April 9, 2013
  • On April 8, 2013
    Amanda Arnold is now following Mutia Adisoma
  • On April 8, 2013
    Amanda Arnold is now following Stephanie Brookes
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    Amanda Arnold is now following Nicky Park
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    Amanda Arnold is now following Jackson Reeves
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    Amanda Arnold is now following Andy Nelson
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    Amanda Arnold is now following Ford Fry
  • On March 29, 2013
  • On March 27, 2013
    Amanda Arnold answered the question: Amanda Arnold

    What are the best Charleston food experiences?

    Next time I'm in Charleston, I'd love to try The Ordinary, a seafood hall and oyster bar set in an old bank in downtown Charleston, which opened in December 2012. The menu is jam-packed with every possible hot and cold seafood delight, all purchased from local fisherman — peel and eat shrimp, clam cake, Maine lobster ceviche, lobster bisque — which can be washed down with a fine wine, craft beer or an aperitif.

    On Easter Sunday, downtown Charleston’s streets are filled with colorful ladies’ hats, I was delighted to learn when we headed to High Cotton for Easter brunch. This tidy, top-notch restaurant with lovely heart pine floors, exposed brick walls and knowledgeable servers offers contemporary low-country-style cuisine made with local ingredients. For brunch, try the Carolina Shrimp and Grits — Andouille, okra, tomatoes, garlic and serrano shrimp broth — or the Southern Breakfast Cassoulet — sunny-side up eggs over pork belly, shredded duck, butterbeans, red pepper jelly, sweet corn and tomatoes.

    But truth be told, my favorite Charleston haunt is The Wreck of the Richard & Charlene, a hole-in-the-wall, locals favorite set on Shem Creek in Mount Pleasant, S.C., just across the picturesque Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge from downtown Charleston. The screened-in restaurant may look more shabby than chic, but it serves excellent, authentic low-country-style seafood — grilled, fried or broiled scallops, shrimp, oysters and crab (served with tartar and cocktail sauce) — and scrumptious South Carolina sides like hush puppies, fried hominy, red rice, slaw and she-crab soup. Even the banana pudding is exceptional. You won’t need to dress up for this beachy, creek-side eatery — the food is served on paper plates, beer comes in a can and every table receives a bowl of boiled peanuts to start. If there’s a wait, have a drink on the dock and take in the views of the marsh and the fishing boats.
  • On March 27, 2013
    Amanda Arnold answered the question: Amanda Arnold

    What are the best Charleston food experiences?

    Next time I'm in Charleston, I'd love to try The Ordinary, a seafood hall and oyster bar set in an old bank in downtown Charleston, which opened in December 2012. The menu is jam-packed with every possible hot and cold seafood delight, all purchased from local fisherman — peel and eat shrimp, clam cake, Maine lobster ceviche, lobster bisque — which can be washed down with a fine wine, craft beer or an aperitif.

    On Easter Sunday, downtown Charleston’s streets are filled with colorful ladies’ hats, I was delighted to learn when we headed to High Cotton for Easter brunch. This tidy, top-notch restaurant with lovely heart pine floors, exposed brick walls and knowledgeable servers offers contemporary low-country-style cuisine made with local ingredients. For brunch, try the Carolina Shrimp and Grits — Andouille, okra, tomatoes, garlic and serrano shrimp broth — or the Southern Breakfast Cassoulet — sunny-side up eggs over pork belly, shredded duck, butterbeans, red pepper jelly, sweet corn and tomatoes.

    My favorite Charleston haunt is The Wreck of the Richard & Charlene, a hole-in-the-wall, locals favorite set on Shem Creek in Mount Pleasant, S.C., just across the picturesque Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge from downtown Charleston. The screened-in restaurant may look more shabby than chic, but it serves excellent, authentic low-country-style seafood — grilled, fried or broiled scallops, shrimp, oysters and crab (served with tartar and cocktail sauce) — and scrumptious South Carolina sides like hush puppies, fried hominy, red rice, slaw and she-crab soup. Even the banana pudding is exceptional. You won’t need to dress up for this beachy, creek-side eatery — the food is served on paper plates, beer comes in a can and every table receives a bowl of boiled peanuts to start. If there’s a wait, have a drink on the dock and take in the views of the marsh and the fishing boats.
  • On March 26, 2013
    Amanda Arnold is now following Kim Ertsås
  • On March 26, 2013
    Amanda Arnold is now following Marianne Wong
  • On March 26, 2013
  • On March 26, 2013
    Amanda Arnold is now following Michael Romei