Angela Corrias

Correspondent

  • Rome, Italy, EUR

Angela Corrias is a freelance travel journalist and photographer who lives in Rome, Italy and covers the city for Forbes Travel Guide. Born in Italy, she left her home country after college and since then she has lived in Dublin, London and Shanghai. Among the others, her work has appeared in Chinese newspaper Global Times, Literary Traveler, GoNomad and Matador Network. She’s happiest when on the road in the perpetual quest for the unknown, capturing colors and flavors around the world for her blog Chasing The Unexpected.

  • On June 25, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What is Rome Termini train station like?

    Termini is Rome's main train station, connecting the city with the rest of Italy and serving as a hub also for many buses, connecting point of the two metro lines and airports' and extra-urban coaches. The station's main entrances are in Via Giolitti and Piazza dei Cinquecento, where is also the departure point for several buses. The interior of the station has been recently renovated, and now it really is a glamorous state-of-the-art building.

    With almost 500 thousands visitors daily and 150 million a year, Stazione Termini is the biggest and busiest train station in Italy and the second one in Europe for size and traffic, after Paris' Gare du Nord.

    Apart from the ticket office of Trenitalia, Italian railroad company, open daily from 6am to 10pm, the many ticket machines and almost 30 platforms, three-storied Stazione Termini hosts also a plethora of restaurants, cafeterias, bars, pizza places, supermarkets, clothing, shoes and accessories shops, book and music shops, newsagents, cosmetics shops such as Sephora, L'Occitane en Provence and Bottega Verde, pharmacies, a post office, and even a gym, HealthCity.

    From Stazione Termini you can reach every area of the city, including both airports, Fiumicino, for which there is a direct train leaving every half an hour, and Ciampino, connected through different buses.
  • On June 25, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best free museums in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Apart from hosting huge open-air, therefore free, permanent ancient ruins exhibits and boasting immortal masterpieces in its many churches, such as Michelangelo's La Pietà at Saint Peter's Basilica or three Caravaggio's paintings at San Luigi dei Francesi, Rome has also some indoor free museums worth a stop.

    When you are done with the city's must-dos, most of which do have an entrance fee, the first and easiest free museum to visit is the Vittoriano Complex in Piazza Venezia, where apart from the permanent exhibition of the Italian Risorgimento, the battles that brought about the country's unification, there are often also temporary exhibitions of photographers or painters that are usually free of charge.

    Another free museum definitely worth a visit is the Museo Archeologico di Via Ostiense (Via Ostiense Archaeological Museum), inside Porta San Paolo (Saint Paul's Gate), entirely devoted to the ancient Roman road starting from Porta San Paolo itself up to Ostia Antica.

    Another interesting indoor experience is Museo Boncompagni Ludovisi, in 18 Via Boncompagni, which is actually the former residence of the Boncompagni Ludovisi family, aiming to show the furniture, the decoration, clothes and accessories the wealthy members of the Italian society of the early 20th century used and displayed, along with some of the finest examples of the made in Italy.

    Also, even though the Vatican Museums usually charge an entrance fee, if you happen in Rome on the last Sunday of the month, from 9am to 2pm with the last entrance at 12,30pm, you can join the long queue of tourists waiting to enter for free, maybe making it less hard by having a good gelato from the Old Bridge, delicious ice cream shop right in front of the Vatican Walls..
  • On June 25, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best free museums in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Apart from hosting huge open-air, therefore free, permanent ancient ruins exhibits and boasting immortal masterpieces in its many churches, such as Michelangelo's La Pietà at Saint Peter's Basilica or three Caravaggio's paintings at San Luigi dei Francesi, Rome has also some indoor free museums worth a stop.

    When you are done with the city's must-dos, most of which do have an entrance fee, the first and easiest free museum to visit is the Vittoriano Complex in Piazza Venezia, where apart from the permanent exhibition of the Italian Risorgimento, the battles that brought about the country's unification, there are often also temporary exhibitions of photographers or painters that are usually free of charge.

    Another free museum definitely worth a visit is the Museo Archeologico di Via Ostiense (Via Ostiense Archaeological Museum), inside Porta San Paolo (Saint Paul's Gate), entirely devoted to the ancient Roman road starting from Porta San Paolo itself up to Ostia Antica.

    Another interesting indoor experience is Museo Boncompagni Ludovisi, in 18 Via Boncompagni, which is actually the former residence of the Boncompagni Ludovisi family, aiming to show the furniture, the decoration, clothes and accessories the wealthy members of the Italian society of the early 20th century used and displayed, along with some of the finest examples of the made in Italy.

    Also, even though the Vatican Museums usually charge an entrance fee, if you happen in Rome on the last Sunday of the month, from 9am to 2pm with the last entrance at 12,30pm, you can join the long queue of tourists waiting to enter for free, maybe making it less hard by having a good gelato from the Old Bridge, delicious ice cream shop right in front of the Vatican Walls..
  • On June 24, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best vegan restaurants in Rome?

    Rather than strictly vegan places, in Rome you can find vegetarian restaurants that offer vegan options, often with a very good selection of egg- and milk-free dishes.

    One of the places where I have found the widest choice of vegan dishes is Ops, buffet-style eatery in 56 Via Bergamo, near Piazza Fiume. Here, apart from a seldom use of milk-based butter, yogurt and cheese, most of the times you can find dishes prepared with tofu, seitan (wheat-based product often used as a replacement for meat in vegetarian recipes) and vegetable milk.

    Vegans will also find plenty of dishes suitable to their diet at L'Insalatiera, Taverna Vegetariana, in Ottaviano area, 94 Via Trionfale, a stone's throw away from the Vatican City. Here the menu is really half-vegetarian (so with dishes made using milk and eggs) and half-vegan. Among the vegan dishes are curry cous cous with veggies, spelt with pan-fried veggies, eggplant balls with potatoes and tofu alla pizzaiola (tofu with tomato, olives and capers).

    Also at Bibliothè, Indian-inspired restaurant in the city center (4 Via Celsa), most dishes are egg-free according to the Hindu tradition, but some are made using milk and the typical Indian fresh cheese, paneer.
  • On June 22, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best places for pasta in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Being the capital of the country famous the world over for its pasta dishes, it's really not difficult to find good pasta in Rome. Carbonara, amatriciana, cacio e pepe, they are all typical Roman dishes, and if you stray a little from the tourist trail you can find the properly traditional recipes.

    A great place for pasta in Rome is Flavio Al Velavevodetto in Testaccio neighborhood (97 Via di Monte Testaccio). Their pasta is perfectly al dente and richly dressed, but if you want to enjoy also a cozy Roman atmosphere, avoid the weekend, when it's too crowded and noisy.

    Still in Testaccio, in 29 via Mastro Giorgio, an exquisite tonnarelli cacio e pepe (pasta with cacio cheese and pepper) can be ordered at Felice, glorious traditional restaurant since 1936, while for an excellent carbonara try Trattoria da Danilo, 13 Via Petrarca, in the lovely Esquilino area.

    Apart from the strictly Roman tradition, you can find delicious pappardelle al sugo di lepre (pappardelle pasta with hare sauce), dish belonging to the Umbrian cuisine, at La Tavernetta Umbra in 103 viale Giulio Cesare, in Ottaviano area, near the Vatican.
  • On June 22, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best places for pasta in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Being the capital of the country famous the world over for its pasta dishes, it's really not difficult to find good pasta in Rome. Carbonara, amatriciana, cacio e pepe, they are all typical Roman dishes, and if you stray a little from the tourist trail you can find the properly traditional recipes.

    A great place for pasta in Rome is Flavio Al Velavevodetto in Testaccio neighborhood (97 Via di Monte Testaccio). Their pasta is perfectly al dente and richly dressed, but if you want to enjoy also a cozy Roman atmosphere, avoid the weekend, when it's too crowded and noisy.

    Still in Testaccio, in 29 via Mastro Giorgio, an exquisite tonnarelli cacio e pepe (pasta with cacio cheese and pepper) can be ordered at Felice, glorious traditional restaurant since 1936, while for an excellent carbonara try Trattoria da Danilo, 13 Via Petrarca, in the lovely Esquilino area.

    Apart from the strictly Roman tradition, you can find delicious pappardelle al sugo di lepre (pappardelle pasta with hare sauce), dish belonging to the Umbrian cuisine, at La Tavernetta Umbra in 103 viale Giulio Cesare, in Ottaviano area, near the Vatican.
  • On June 21, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are some things to know before visiting Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Rome is a pretty easy city to wander, full of tourists all year round, but there still are some things you should better know before arriving.

    First of all, even though a major tourist destination for ages, locals don't speak much English. In the most popular attractions you will sure find staff proficient in different languages, but right outside don't rely too much on the fact that you are in a touristy area, you should still carry a basic dictionary with you and a map in case you need to ask for directions.

    One more thing you should know in case you want to enjoy Rome's nightlife is that public transportation at night is not excellent. The metro closes around 1am on weekends and midnight during week days, and although there are night buses, they are not very frequent. This is why if you are bent on spending your nights out, your best bet is to book your accommodation near the city center, giving you the opportunity to either walk back to your hotel or take a taxi without spending too much.

    It's also good to know that when you arrive at Fiumicino Airport, the taxi fare from there to anywhere inside the Aurelian Walls, city center included, is set to 48 euro, while from Ciampino Airport is 30 euro, so make sure this is what you pay.
  • On June 21, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are some things to know before visiting Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Rome is a pretty easy city to wander, full of tourists all year round, but there still are some things you should better know before arriving.

    First of all, even though a major tourist destination for ages, locals don't speak much English. In the most popular attractions you will sure find staff proficient in different languages, but right outside don't rely too much on the fact that you are in a touristy area, you should still carry a basic dictionary with you and a map in case you need to ask for directions.

    One more thing you should know in case you want to enjoy Rome's nightlife is that public transportation at night is not excellent. The metro closes around 1am on weekends and midnight during week days, and although there are night buses, they are not very frequent. This is why if you are bent on spending your nights out, your best bet is to book your accommodation near the city center, giving you the opportunity to either walk back to your hotel or take a taxi without spending too much.

    It's also good to know that when you arrive at Fiumicino Airport, the taxi fare from there to anywhere inside the Aurelian Walls, city center included, is set to 48 euro, while from Ciampino Airport is 30 euro, so make sure this is what you pay.
  • On June 21, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best bakeries in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Luckily for bread-lovers like me, Rome is full of excellent bakeries. In every neighborhood the tempting scent of freshly baked bread floats on the air teasing both Italian and foreign palates.

    Whatever diet they're on or whatever the occasion is, Italians will never be able to do without bread on their table. Brown, crunchy, spongy, as bread is the very first staple in the Bel Paese, the many bakeries have been evolving and inventing new types of the beloved good.

    One of the oldest and most popular bakeries in Rome is Antico Forno Roscioli, 34 Via dei Chiavari, near Campo de' Fiori. You'll hardly resist their mouthwatering display window, and once inside you'll have a huge choice of bread made following Roman traditional recipes, and plenty of cakes, pastries and all types of sweets, from warm apple pies to pistachio pies to delicious cakes made with ricotta and chocolate.

    Still near Campo de' Fiori is another famous bakery, Forno Campo de' Fiori (Campo de' Fiori 22) open since 1970 and whose promise is to use only highly selected ingredients to ensure the best quality.

    One of my very favorite is Panella, 54 Via Merulana, near Piazza Vittorio, delicious bakery living up to its promises for almost 100 years. Delicious its walnut bread, bread with five cereals, black olive bread and specialties such as arugula bread and pumpkin bread. Hard to resist also their sweet products, from the mini sacher cakes, to the jam tarts to the cream dumplings.
  • On June 21, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best bakeries in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Luckily for bread-lovers like me, Rome is full of excellent bakeries. In every neighborhood the tempting scent of freshly baked bread floats on the air teasing both Italian and foreign palates.

    Whatever diet they're on or whatever the occasion is, Italians will never be able to do without bread on their table. Brown, crunchy, spongy, as bread is the very first staple in the Bel Paese, the many bakeries have been evolving and inventing new types of the beloved good.

    One of the oldest and most popular bakeries in Rome is Antico Forno Roscioli, 34 Via dei Chiavari, near Campo de' Fiori. You'll hardly resist their mouthwatering display window, and once inside you'll have a huge choice of bread made following Roman traditional recipes, and plenty of cakes, pastries and all types of sweets, from warm apple pies to pistachio pies to delicious cakes made with ricotta and chocolate.

    Still near Campo de' Fiori is another famous bakery, Forno Campo de' Fiori (Campo de' Fiori 22) open since 1970 and whose promise is to use only highly selected ingredients to ensure the best quality.

    One of my very favorite is Panella, 54 Via Merulana, near Piazza Vittorio, delicious bakery living up to its promises for almost 100 years. Delicious its walnut bread, bread with five cereals, black olive bread and specialties such as arugula bread and pumpkin bread. Hard to resist also their sweet products, from the mini sacher cakes, to the jam tarts to the cream dumplings.
  • On June 12, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best Indian restaurants in Rome?

    As a perfect foodie haven, apart from Italian cuisine, Rome also boasts some excellent places where to enjoy scents and flavors from all over the world. As one of the most appreciated foreign culinary traditions, the city has a great choice of Indian restaurants.

    One of my favorite is in Prati neighborhood, 68/70 Via Fabio Massimo. It's called Shanti and advertises itself as an Indian and Pakistani restaurant. Apart from the lovely, cozy ambiance that inevitably evokes the Subcontinent's tangy aroma and balmy melodies, their menu is a mouthwatering mix of tandoori, tikka masala, curries and vegetarian dishes, among which I never resist from ordering Palak Paneer, typical Indian fresh cheese soaked in a delicious spinach-based sauce, always able to bring me back to wild India.

    The area that boasts possibly the highest number of Indian restaurants, though, is naturally the neighborhood sprawling around Piazza Vittorio, Rome's multi-ethnic heart. One good Indian eatery there is in 237 Via Principe Amedeo, Taste of India, offering also the take-away service, while in 11 Via Mamiani, near Termini station, is Janta Fast Food, simple and tasty eatery that prides itself as Rome's first Indian fast food.

    If you want an Indian treat for dinner in Monti area closer to the city center, head to 4 Via Cimarra, off via dei Serpenti, grab a table at the lovely restaurant Il Guru and pamper yourself with specialties from Southern India. The owners of this restaurant also run a spice shop, Le Spezie del Guru, in 15 Via Lamarmora, near Piazza Vittorio, a place you might want to visit if you are a fan of Ayurveda medicine.
  • On May 31, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best places to hear live music in Rome?

    There are many places in Rome where you can spend a nice evening listening to live music, either for or after dinner. Being the Mecca of Rome's nightlife, Trastevere is obviously one of the best neighborhoods if you want to find artists performing live. However, also in other districts such as Prati, Campo de' Fiori or Testaccio, where the many nightclubs often show live performances, it's not uncommon to stumble on live concerts in restaurants and pubs.

    One of the most famous places for live music in Rome is Big Mama, in 18 Vicolo San Francesco a Ripa in Trastevere. For almost thirty years has been giving space to some of the greatest international artists. They often play blues music, to the extent that they are known as the Home of Blues in Rome, but they also showcase jazz, rock and ethnic bands, musicians and singers.

    Jazz lovers should head to 9 Via Ostia in Prati area, where Alexanderplatz offers a live concert every night with performances of artists from all over the world. Their cuisine too is international albeit with a strong Mediterranean imprint.
  • On May 31, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What restaurants have the best views in Rome?

    Among the restaurants with the best views in Rome, probably the most famous is Lo Zodiaco, to the extent that locals even suggest it as the first choice when it comes to a romantic dinner. Serving traditional Roman dishes and also specialties from other parts of Italy including a good pizza, Lo Zodiaco is located in 88 Viale del Parco Mellini, inside the natural reserve of Monte Mario, Rome's tallest hill just behind the Foro Italico.

    Another restaurant boasting a fantastic view on Rome is Casina Valadier, in Piazza Bucarest, in Villa Borghese, and is located in the highest point of the Pincio, with a great view on the city center. Casina Valadier is in a building dating back to the 16th century and serves a great selection of fine cuisine belonging to the Italian tradition with a good choice of vegetarian options.

    A little far from the city center is another restaurant that offers a lovely view, Il Fungo, in 1/A Piazza Pakistan, elegant eatery on the fourteenth floor of a tower built in the 1950s in Eur area.
  • On May 31, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best places for cappuccino in Rome?

    Usually in Rome where you can find a great espresso you can also find a great cappuccino. Very much adored drink, “cappuccino e cornetto” is the typical Italian breakfast. Like for espresso, also cappuccino can be ordered in its different variations, such as with a sprinkle of chocolate powder, “schiumoso” with more foam, cold, caffeine-free and many other types.

    Among the best places for cappuccino in Rome are Sant'Eustachio Il Caffè in 82 Piazza Sant'Eustachio, near the Pantheon, where they use high-quality coffee grains, fresh and toasted in wood oven, and Sciascia Caffè 1919 in 80/A Via Fabio Massimo, Prati area, famous cafeteria that serves many types of cappuccino, among which cold cappuccino and cappuccino made with barley instead of coffee.

    A good place for cappuccino is also Castroni, in Via Cola di Rienzo and Via Ottaviano. Castroni is not really a cafeteria or a pastry-shop, but a shop specialized in gourmet food, where you can find delicacies from all over the world, from different types of tea to herbs, spices, coffee and chocolate. Along with great savory snacks, they also prepare a good espresso and a great cappuccino.
  • On May 31, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best places for espresso in Rome?

    When you order a coffee in Rome ("un caffè"), you should know you are going to get an espresso. Coffee in Italy is such a big deal that it's probably what Italians miss the most when they travel. Of course our love for coffee has made us evolve the product into different versions and flavors, and now if you go to any bar in the country you can hear orders of any types, “lungo”, “corto”, “con schiuma”, “macchiato”, “marocchino” (espresso with milk foam and chocolate), and many others.

    Rome has many great places for espresso, and some of the very best are Sant'Eustachio Il Caffè in 82 Piazza Sant'Eustachio, that serves a great variety of coffees strictly made with high quality ingredients, Ciampini in Piazza San Lorenzo in Lucina, near the Pantheon, and, close to Via Veneto, Bar Gino, in 52 Via San Basilio, where you can also try some of their excellent pastries.

    Among the best coffee places in Rome, Sciascia Caffè 1919 (80/A Via Fabio Massimo) is definitely worth a stop for its espresso but also for the other coffee-based products and the pastries they serve, and not far from there, in 234 Via Cola di Rienzo, is Cantiani, patisserie adored among locals that serves also an excellent espresso.