Angela Corrias

Correspondent

  • Rome, Italy, EUR

Angela Corrias is a freelance travel journalist and photographer who lives in Rome, Italy and covers the city for Forbes Travel Guide. Born in Italy, she left her home country after college and since then she has lived in Dublin, London and Shanghai. Among the others, her work has appeared in Chinese newspaper Global Times, Literary Traveler, GoNomad and Matador Network. She’s happiest when on the road in the perpetual quest for the unknown, capturing colors and flavors around the world for her blog Chasing The Unexpected.

  • On May 13, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best neighborhoods in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Each neighborhood in Rome has its own personality, attractions and things to do, thus depending on what you are looking for, make sure you know where you are going.

    Everybody knows downtown Rome and its most famous historic and artistic gems, and although also here there's still much to be discovered beyond Fontana di Trevi and Piazza Navona, this is hardly an area that needs any introduction.

    Near the city center, from Piazza di Spagna up to Piazza Navona-Campo de' Fiori, a neighborhood that  enshrines more ancient ruins, such as the Fori Imperiali, Nero's Domus Aurea and Trajan's Baths, together with moments of daily life is Monti, where different experiences are possible, from trendy shopping in Via Nazionale to soaking in the fascinating atmosphere of Piazza Vittorio, possibly Rome's most cosmopolitan hub, to visiting the beautiful Santa Maria Maggiore Basilica.

    For a glimpse on traditional Rome, some of the best neighborhoods are Trastevere and Testaccio, but while Trastevere has now acquired a strong touristy identity, Testaccio still maintains its original working-class vibe. If you are in Trastevere, the best way to get under the skin of the area is simply to get lost around its narrow cobbled alleys and take in its atmosphere by stopping at its local shops, traditional eateries and the places that have marked the history of this gentrified area formerly inhabited by immigrants and the working class. On the other hand, in Testaccio, located on the left bank of the river and south of the Aventino Hill, you can appreciate the proper Roman identity by touring its streets and visiting its famous food market and former soccer field of the local team AS Roma.

    If you like shopping, apart from central Via del Corso, Via Frattina and Via dei Condotti, head to Rione Prati, the neighborhood just beside the Vatican, where you can find cheaper yet stylish clothing, shoes, accessories and jewelry boutiques, along with good restaurants and gelaterie serving some of the best gelato in the city.

    Prati neighborhood is near another area sure worth your time, Vaticano-San Pietro, that goes from around Porta Cavalleggeri to Piazza Risorgimento/Via Ottaviano crossing the Vatican City and that, quite predictably, is a religious-driven district, so the best place for religious tourism and for finding religious artwork.

    A bit further north you'll find Trionfale area, where you can visit the colorful food market and carry on with your tour up to Monte Mario for a stroll in Monte Mario Natural Reserve, park of great cultural and environmental value with inside Villa Mellini and Villa Mazzanti, where is the astronomical observatory that offers a great view on the city.
  • On May 13, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best neighborhoods in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Each neighborhood in Rome has its own personality, attractions and things to do, thus depending on what you are looking for, make sure you know where you are going.

    Everybody knows downtown Rome and its most famous historic and artistic gems, and although also here there's still much to be discovered beyond Fontana di Trevi and Piazza Navona, this is hardly an area that needs any introduction.

    Near the city center, from Piazza di Spagna up to Piazza Navona-Campo de' Fiori, a neighborhood that  enshrines more ancient ruins, such as the Fori Imperiali, Nero's Domus Aurea and Trajan's Baths, together with moments of daily life is Monti, where different experiences are possible, from trendy shopping in Via Nazionale to soaking in the fascinating atmosphere of Piazza Vittorio, possibly Rome's most cosmopolitan hub, to visiting the beautiful Santa Maria Maggiore Basilica.

    For a glimpse on traditional Rome, some of the best neighborhoods are Trastevere and Testaccio, but while Trastevere has now acquired a strong touristy identity, Testaccio still maintains its original working-class vibe. If you are in Trastevere, the best way to get under the skin of the area is simply to get lost around its narrow cobbled alleys and take in its atmosphere by stopping at its local shops, traditional eateries and the places that have marked the history of this gentrified area formerly inhabited by immigrants and the working class. On the other hand, in Testaccio, located on the left bank of the river and south of the Aventino Hill, you can appreciate the proper Roman identity by touring its streets and visiting its famous food market and former soccer field of the local team AS Roma.

    If you like shopping, apart from central Via del Corso, Via Frattina and Via dei Condotti, head to Rione Prati, the neighborhood just beside the Vatican, where you can find cheaper yet stylish clothing, shoes, accessories and jewelry boutiques, along with good restaurants and gelaterie serving some of the best gelato in the city.

    Prati neighborhood is near another area sure worth your time, Vaticano-San Pietro, that goes from around Porta Cavalleggeri to Piazza Risorgimento/Via Ottaviano crossing the Vatican City and that, quite predictably, is a religious-driven district, so the best place for religious tourism and for finding religious artwork.

    A bit further north you'll find Trionfale area, where you can visit the colorful food market and carry on with your tour up to Monte Mario for a stroll in Monte Mario Natural Reserve, park of great cultural and environmental value with inside Villa Mellini and Villa Mazzanti, where is the astronomical observatory that offers a great view on the city.
  • On May 1, 2013
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  • On April 30, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best parks in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Rome boasts many green oases, some of which cover pretty big areas within the city center. Probably the most popular also among tourists, albeit not the largest one, Villa Borghese can be accessed from Piazza del Popolo, Piazza di Spagna, Piazzale Flaminio and Piazzale San Paolo del Brasile.

    Hosting many museums, the zoo, smaller gardens, the Globe Theatre and the Casa del Cinema (Cinema House) within its premises, Villa Borghese has something to offer to anybody, and either you want to spend a day admiring art masterpieces or immersing in nature, the park will not let you down.

    Another huge park a little further from the city center, in Gianicolo-Monteverde area, is Villa Doria Pamphili, where it's possible to do outdoor activities like running, biking or even just a picnic. Inside Villa Pamphili there is an organic bistro that prepares also picnic boxes for the customers who prefer having their lunch sitting on the grass rather than inside. Summertime, this park is a favorite venue for concerts, festivals and exhibitions.

    Former Mussolini residence, the park of Villa Torlonia in Via Nomentana today can be visited and enjoyed for its liberty-style architecture and the activities for kids organized from time to time. Although it's not very big, it's well-kept and makes it for a lovely afternoon out.

    One of the most popular gardens among locals, Villa Ada in Via Salaria hosts a great variety of plants and trees, along with a skating rink and fitness facilities, while Villa Celimontana, within Parco Celio, between the Colosseum and the Caracalla Baths, is a fave among jazz lovers for the international music shows that every year take place there.

    At the feet of the Aventino Hill lies the Roseto Comunale, a lovely rose garden open only during spring. If you are in Rome in this time of the year, spend there a couple of hours, and apart from a beautiful view on the Circus Maximus, you can admire and smell more than a thousand species of roses. Still on the Aventino, but this time on the top, you can visit another type of garden, of the oranges, or Giardino degli Aranci, where the sweet smell of the fruits will make the view on the river Tevere even more enchanting.
  • On April 30, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best parks in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Rome boasts many green oases, some of which cover pretty big areas within the city center. Probably the most popular also among tourists, albeit not the largest one, Villa Borghese can be accessed from Piazza del Popolo, Piazza di Spagna, Piazzale Flaminio and Piazzale San Paolo del Brasile.

    Hosting many museums, the zoo, smaller gardens, the Globe Theatre and the Casa del Cinema (Cinema House) within its premises, Villa Borghese has something to offer to anybody, and either you want to spend a day admiring art masterpieces or immersing in nature, the park will not let you down.

    Another huge park a little further from the city center, in Gianicolo-Monteverde area, is Villa Doria Pamphili, where it's possible to do outdoor activities like running, biking or even just a picnic. Inside Villa Pamphili there is an organic bistro that prepares also picnic boxes for the customers who prefer having their lunch sitting on the grass rather than inside. Summertime, this park is a favorite venue for concerts, festivals and exhibitions.

    Former Mussolini residence, the park of Villa Torlonia in Via Nomentana today can be visited and enjoyed for its liberty-style architecture and the activities for kids organized from time to time. Although it's not very big, it's well-kept and makes it for a lovely afternoon out.

    One of the most popular gardens among locals, Villa Ada in Via Salaria hosts a great variety of plants and trees, along with a skating rink and fitness facilities, while Villa Celimontana, within Parco Celio, between the Colosseum and the Caracalla Baths, is a fave among jazz lovers for the international music shows that every year take place there.

    At the feet of the Aventino Hill lies the Roseto Comunale, a lovely rose garden open only during spring. If you are in Rome in this time of the year, spend there a couple of hours, and apart from a beautiful view on the Circus Maximus, you can admire and smell more than a thousand species of roses. Still on the Aventino, but this time on the top, you can visit another type of garden, of the oranges, or Giardino degli Aranci, where the sweet smell of the fruits will make the view on the river Tevere even more enchanting.
  • On April 30, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best farmers markets in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Whenever I'm able to devote the right time to my precious grocery shopping, I love wandering about the colorful stalls of Rome's farmers markets.

    Only in the city center and in its surroundings you can find several open markets where local producers sell fresh season produce. For a bit of a tourist experience, head to Campo de' Fiori, where every day early morning you will find possibly the oldest farmers market in the city showcasing fruits, veggies, cheese, sausages, fish and also ready-to-eat local specialties on the go such as pasta cacio e pepe, carbonara (with pancetta bacon, egg and cheese) and amatriciana (spicy tomato sauce with cured pig cheek).

    Another great market, also well-known among tourists, is Mercato Testaccio, in Via Galvani, in Testaccio neighborhood. Here, apart from groceries, cheese, meat and fish, you will also find stalls making sandwiches and even a pasticceria (pastry shop), Dess'Art, where Sicilian-born Costanza prepares delicious cannoli, a traditional dessert from her region.

    In the very heart of Trastevere, Piazza San Cosimato, every morning Monday to Saturday from 6am to 1pm takes place another lovely farmers market, Mercato di Trastevere, selling anything from local produce to French cheese and sausages to second-hand books and even pets' food.

    While all neighborhoods have their own markets, two are my very favorite: Nuovo Mercato Esquilino, replacing former Mercato Vittorio, near Piazza Vittorio, certainly one of Rome's most multicultural areas where all foreign communities go shopping and where, apart from fruits and veggies from all over the world, you can find a great variety of beans, cereals and international herbs and spices; and Mercato Trionfale, in Via Andrea Doria, Rome's biggest market and one of the largest in Italy. Here you can find anything from fresh and dried fruits, season veggies, meat, fish, freshly baked bread and pastries, organic products, cheese and even some stalls selling clothes.
  • On April 30, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best farmers markets in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Whenever I'm able to devote the right time to my precious grocery shopping, I love wandering about the colorful stalls of Rome's farmers markets.

    Only in the city center and in its surroundings you can find several open markets where local producers sell fresh season produce. For a bit of a tourist experience, head to Campo de' Fiori, where every day early morning you will find possibly the oldest farmers market in the city showcasing fruits, veggies, cheese, sausages, fish and also ready-to-eat local specialties on the go such as pasta cacio e pepe, carbonara (with pancetta bacon, egg and cheese) and amatriciana (spicy tomato sauce with cured pig cheek).

    Another great market, also well-known among tourists, is Mercato Testaccio, in Via Galvani, in Testaccio neighborhood. Here, apart from groceries, cheese, meat and fish, you will also find stalls making sandwiches and even a pasticceria (pastry shop), Dess'Art, where Sicilian-born Costanza prepares delicious cannoli, a traditional dessert from her region.

    In the very heart of Trastevere, Piazza San Cosimato, every morning Monday to Saturday from 6am to 1pm takes place another lovely farmers market, Mercato di Trastevere, selling anything from local produce to French cheese and sausages to second-hand books and even pets' food.

    While all neighborhoods have their own markets, two are my very favorite: Nuovo Mercato Esquilino, replacing former Mercato Vittorio, near Piazza Vittorio, certainly one of Rome's most multicultural areas where all foreign communities go shopping and where, apart from fruits and veggies from all over the world, you can find a great variety of beans, cereals and international herbs and spices; and Mercato Trionfale, in Via Andrea Doria, Rome's biggest market and one of the largest in Italy. Here you can find anything from fresh and dried fruits, season veggies, meat, fish, freshly baked bread and pastries, organic products, cheese and even some stalls selling clothes.
  • On April 30, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What is the one must-do activity when visiting Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Picking strictly one must-do activity when visiting Rome is not only hard but also unfair, as it obviously implies to tick off your list a whole spectrum of interesting places to visit and memorable experiences to make.

    While I think embarking on culinary itineraries to discover traditional cuisine is a great way to unearth Rome's past, if there is only time for one must-do activity, it has to be a tour along the Fori Imperiali and the Colosseum, including the Campidoglio (Capitoline Hill) and possibly the Caracalla Baths.

    This historical walk will not only give you a strong hint on the majesty of Rome's ancient past, but also on Romans' personality, pride for their history, knack for pampering themselves as revealed at the Baths and legendary roots as shown at the Campidoglio, where according to the myth, Rome itself was founded.

    Everywhere in the city it's possible to see ancient sites sitting side by side with medieval manors, but a great starting point is right here in its heart, where it all began.
  • On April 30, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What is the one must-do activity when visiting Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Picking strictly one must-do activity when visiting Rome is not only hard but also unfair, as it obviously implies to tick off your list a whole spectrum of interesting places to visit and memorable experiences to make.

    While I think embarking on culinary itineraries to discover traditional cuisine is a great way to unearth Rome's past, if there is only time for one must-do activity, it has to be a tour along the Fori Imperiali and the Colosseum, including the Campidoglio (Capitoline Hill) and possibly the Caracalla Baths.

    This historical walk will not only give you a strong hint on the majesty of Rome's ancient past, but also on Romans' personality, pride for their history, knack for pampering themselves as revealed at the Baths and legendary roots as shown at the Campidoglio, where according to the myth, Rome itself was founded.

    Everywhere in the city it's possible to see ancient sites sitting side by side with medieval manors, but a great starting point is right here in its heart, where it all began.
  • On April 30, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best summer activities in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Rome is by all means a vibrant city all year, but summertime it becomes even more exciting, with dozens of events of all kinds to be enjoyed all throughout its neighborhoods.

    Concerts, dance performances, art events and festivals are organized in many locations all over the city, being its beautiful parks a privileged setting. These green oases always host open-air activities, especially the largest one, Villa Doria Pamphilj, one of the most popular venues for important festivals such as I Concerti del Parco (The Park's Concerts), Invito alla Danza (Invitation to Dance) and Teatro Verde, a theater show for kids.

    In the warm season, the council lights up the Colosseum at night, making it even more suggestive both watching it from outside and visiting its interior.

    This year, along with a plethora of themed tours and initiatives such as the opportunity to visit the Vatican Museums and the Sistine Chapel at night from 7pm to 11pm every Friday from May 3rd to July 26th and from September 6th to October 25th, Rome's council and cultural associations will organize concerts welcoming Italian and international bands and singers, with names of the likes of Green Day, Blur, Bruce Springsteen and Depeche Mode already confirmed.

    Truth be said, even if you don't feel like attending any of the myriad of events on stage, just walking along the river Tevere enjoying your favorite gelato flavors will make it for an unforgettable summer evening.
  • On April 30, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best summer activities in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Rome is by all means a vibrant city all year, but summertime it becomes even more exciting, with dozens of events of all kinds to be enjoyed all throughout its neighborhoods.

    Concerts, dance performances, art events and festivals are organized in many locations all over the city, being its beautiful parks a privileged setting. These green oases always host open-air activities, especially the largest one, Villa Doria Pamphilj, one of the most popular venues for important festivals such as I Concerti del Parco (The Park's Concerts), Invito alla Danza (Invitation to Dance) and Teatro Verde, a theater show for kids.

    In the warm season, the council lights up the Colosseum at night, making it even more suggestive both watching it from outside and visiting its interior.

    This year, along with a plethora of themed tours and initiatives such as the opportunity to visit the Vatican Museums and the Sistine Chapel at night from 7pm to 11pm every Friday from May 3rd to July 26th and from September 6th to October 25th, Rome's council and cultural associations will organize concerts welcoming Italian and international bands and singers, with names of the likes of Green Day, Blur, Bruce Springsteen and Depeche Mode already confirmed.

    Truth be said, even if you don't feel like attending any of the myriad of events on stage, just walking along the river Tevere enjoying your favorite gelato flavors will make it for an unforgettable summer evening.
  • On April 30, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What is the Rome Metro like?

    Rome has two metro lines, A (red color) and B (blue color), covering about 40 km of the territory and intersecting at Termini, Rome's main train station and important bus hub. Due to the city's huge size, two metro lines are not enough to cover the whole area, and citizens need to take also buses and trams to reach places far from the city center.

    Line A has 27 stops, starts in Battistini and ends in Anagnina, near Cinecittà. Stopping near all the main historic, cultural and religious attractions such as the Vatican, Piazza di Spagna, Fontana di Trevi and Piazza del Popolo, the trains of this line are always jam-packed with tourists. Line B counts 25 stops and travels from Laurentina to Rebibbia/Conca d'Oro, stopping near places like San Paolo Fuori Le Mura basilica, Circus Maximus and the Colosseum.

    On both lines it's always recommended to watch your personal belongings as pickpockets are very active, targeting especially tourists.

    Works for the new Line C (green color) are already taking place, but get often halted not only for the slow beaurocratic machine, but also because wherever they start digging some ancient ruins come to light.

    Apart from the subway, Rome is also served by some lines of overground trains connecting the outskirts and surrounding villages to the city center or to the metro.

    Although underground and overground trains are managed by two different companies, you can use the same ticket available at newsagents, ticket offices and vending machines of the metro stations.

    For info on metro routes and updates, check out Atac website, while for the overground trains, visit Trenitalia web page.
  • On April 28, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best clothing boutiques in Rome?

    Being one of the most popular fashion hubs in Italy, Rome is a true feast of clothing, shoes and accessories stores.

    Take a walk in the city center, starting from legendary Via dei Condotti, right in front of Piazza di Spagna, then heading towards Via del Babuino, Via del Corso, Via Frattina, and if you want a more complete shopping experience for nice but less expensive buys, head to Via Nazionale near Stazione Termini, and Via Cola di Rienzo, in Prati area near the Vatican.

    Via dei Condotti can be considered a huge boutique, with names of the likes of Dolce & Gabbana, Valentino and Trussardi among the others showcasing their best creations, but all around Piazza di Spagna clothing boutiques are the big feature, and between Via Frattina and Via Borgognona you can find both haute couture and prêt-à-porter, with popular brands such as Laura Biagiotti, Giorgio Armani, Alberta Ferretti and Gianfranco Ferré.

    Along with clothes go shoes and accessories, and staying in the same area, in Piazza di Spagna you can also find an excellent choice of footwear, from boots to sandals to stilettos of the most popular brands such as Albano at the 92, Casadei at number 82 and Sergio Rossi at the number 98, wth prices ranging from 100€ up to 1000€.

    If you are a fan of handbags, wallets, belts and all kinds of accessories, around Piazza di Spagna you will certainly find something you like. In 55/56 Via dei Condotti, Furla is one of my favorite for its gorgeous purses, but also Coccinelle at the Galleria Alberto Sordi, in Via del Corso, sells beautiful accessories.
  • On April 26, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best places for dessert in Rome?

    If you've had enough of gelato as the main feature of all your breaks and snacks but you still want something sweet to round off a long but rewarding meal, you can make your way to 8 Via Cassia, near Piazzale Milvio, where you will find Bar Pompi, a pastry shop renowned for its tiramisu, both in its traditional version and other types created in house, such as the heavenly strawberry tiramisu, the banana and nutella variety and the pistachio-based one.

    Piazzale Milvio boasts also other two great places those who have the sweet tooth will love, Mondi, popular ice cream shop, and Il Pellicanogelato shop famous for its toppings made with chocolate, either black or white, and a sprinkle of hazelnuts.

    Thankfully, Pompi's tiramisu is not available only in Piazzale Milvio, but also in its other stores in 7 Via Albalonga, San Giovanni area, and 82 Via della Croce, near Piazza di Spagna.

    If you find yourself in Trastevere you can enjoy a delicious dessert at the historic pastry shop Valzani in 37a/b Via del Moro, where you can choose anything from chilli dark chocolate pralines to exquisite chocolate-coated orange peel to Roman traditional cakes and sweets such as fruit-based Pangiallo, spicy chocolate-based Panpepato and Mostaccioli.
  • On April 21, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What is nightlife like in Rome?

    Rome's nightlife scene is as diverse as the city's neighborhoods, and fortunately for locals and tourists alike, there's enough to please everyone.

    For the youngest, or the most free-spirit ones, Testaccio area boasts a plethora of nightclubs and discopubs playing all sorts of beats, from hip hop to electronic, till late night.

    However, for the ones of you who want to go traditional even at night, don't miss Campo de' Fiori after the sellers of the open market dismantle their stalls, when pubs and restaurants, lined up all around the piazza dominated by Giordano Bruno statue, light up their signs and welcome their guests. From Campo de' Fiori, Trastevere is only a stone's throw away, and after crossing scenic Ponte Sisto you are in one of the most vibrant places Rome can boast by night.

    All sorts of pubs, live music shows, trattorie, bars and open-air gatherings animate Trastevere area that seemingly never sleeps. This old gentrified neighborhood at night becomes the city's pulse where the young, the less young, the classic and the punk meet and share their leisure time.

    Apart from Campo de' Fiori and Trastevere, recently Piazzale Ponte Milvio has been imposing itself as a place of gathering, especially among the youngest, thanks to its cafeterias, bars and gelato shops such as the famed “Mondi” or “Pompi” pastries' shop, famous for its tiramisu.

    The romantic souls don't even need to look for particular places to go, they can just walk along one of the many bridges across the Tevere river and enjoy the view of Saint Peter on one side and Castel Sant'Angelo on the other, with the city lights flitting on the calm waters.