Angela Corrias

Correspondent

  • Rome, Italy, EUR

Angela Corrias is a freelance travel journalist and photographer who lives in Rome, Italy and covers the city for Forbes Travel Guide. Born in Italy, she left her home country after college and since then she has lived in Dublin, London and Shanghai. Among the others, her work has appeared in Chinese newspaper Global Times, Literary Traveler, GoNomad and Matador Network. She’s happiest when on the road in the perpetual quest for the unknown, capturing colors and flavors around the world for her blog Chasing The Unexpected.

  • On April 18, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    Where can you get the best view of Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Counting on hills and strategic terraces, Rome offers its residents and visitors multiple panoramic viewpoints scattered all around its territory.

    Among the most popular places where you can get stunning views of the city is the Janiculum Hill, near Trastevere. Here you can climb up to its terrace and little by little a gorgeous panorama embracing all main monuments and churches will unfold before your eyes.

    For as beautiful as it can be, however, this is not the only place where you can get great views. Thankfully so, since Rome is packed with gorgeous sights, mouments and attractions to be gaped at and photographed.

    Another spot where locals like to indulge and proudly admire their city is Monte Mario, Rome's tallest hill, located behind the Foro Italico. On top is a terrace called Zodiaco, where you can stare at a wonderful scenery and also visit the astronomic observatory, for which a previous request is needed.

    In the very city center, just above Piazza Venezia, on top of the Vittoriano complex is a terrace that offers a great view on the Foro Romano on one side and Saint Peter's Basilica on the other. Go there after visiting one of the many free exhibitions the Vittoriano always hosts.

    At Villa Borghese, one of Rome's most famous parks, right above Piazza del Popolo is the Pincio's large terrace, from where you can enjoy a view on the beautiful square and on the city, very romantic during sunset, the perfect way to round off a day spent in this green oasis.

    On the Aventino Hill, also downtown not far from the Campidoglio, is Giardino degli Aranci, the Garden of the Oranges, from where you can take a great picture of the Tevere River and many of the city's famed landmarks while enjoying the sweet fragrance of the oranges hanging from the trees.

    A wonderful view on the Tevere River can also be enjoyed from the terrace of Castel Sant'Angelo, intriguing monument at the other end of Via della Conciliazione from Saint Peter's Basilica, that covered the most diverse range of roles throughout the centuries, from mausoleum to prison to Renaissance manor, while from the Quirinale terrace you have great views on Ancient Rome's cityscape, to be enjoyed maybe after an exhibition at the Scuderie.
  • On April 18, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    Where can you get the best view of Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Counting on hills and strategic terraces, Rome offers its residents and visitors multiple panoramic viewpoints scattered all around its territory.

    Among the most popular places where you can get stunning views of the city is the Janiculum Hill, near Trastevere. Here you can climb up to its terrace and little by little a gorgeous panorama embracing all main monuments and churches will unfold before your eyes.

    For as beautiful as it can be, however, this is not the only place where you can get great views. Thankfully so, since Rome is packed with gorgeous sights, mouments and attractions to be gaped at and photographed.

    Another spot where locals like to indulge and proudly admire their city is Monte Mario, Rome's tallest hill, located behind the Foro Italico. On top is a terrace called Zodiaco, where you can stare at a wonderful scenery and also visit the astronomic observatory, for which a previous request is needed.

    In the very city center, just above Piazza Venezia, on top of the Vittoriano complex is a terrace that offers a great view on the Foro Romano on one side and Saint Peter's Basilica on the other. Go there after visiting one of the many free exhibitions the Vittoriano always hosts.

    At Villa Borghese, one of Rome's most famous parks, right above Piazza del Popolo is the Pincio's large terrace, from where you can enjoy a view on the beautiful square and on the city, very romantic during sunset, the perfect way to round off a day spent in this green oasis.

    On the Aventino Hill, also downtown not far from the Campidoglio, is Giardino degli Aranci, the Garden of the Oranges, from where you can take a great picture of the Tevere River and many of the city's famed landmarks while enjoying the sweet fragrance of the oranges hanging from the trees.

    A wonderful view on the Tevere River can also be enjoyed from the terrace of Castel Sant'Angelo, intriguing monument at the other end of Via della Conciliazione from Saint Peter's Basilica, that covered the most diverse range of roles throughout the centuries, from mausoleum to prison to Renaissance manor, while from the Quirinale terrace you have great views on Ancient Rome's cityscape, to be enjoyed maybe after an exhibition at the Scuderie.
  • On April 16, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What is Rome’s dining scene like?

    Photo by Angela Corrias It doesn't matter how hard the recession might hit, Romans never turn down an evening out. Packed on the weekend, but lively also on week days, restaurants all over the city welcome guests every night.

    Dining in Rome can assume the traits of a ritual. It never starts before 8pm, unless you consider an aperitivo first, and always lasts at least until 10pm. Dinner is possibly the single best way to catch up with friends and family, meet new people, develop professional networking and discover new eateries.

    It doesn't matter if it's cold, rainy or even snowing, dining out it's something essential. With the nearing of the good season, however, it's all the more pleasant as restaurants put their tables outdoor and you can dine surrounded by the architecture you admired during the day.

    In neighborhoods like Trastevere this is particularly enjoyable as every evening its streets and narrow alleys are a feast of people, tourists and locals alike, walking and relaxing after a day sightseeing or at work, or simply celebrating their weekend.
  • On April 16, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What is Rome’s dining scene like?

    Photo by Angela Corrias It doesn't matter how hard the recession might hit, Romans never turn down an evening out. Packed on the weekend, but lively also on week days, restaurants all over the city welcome guests every night.

    Dining in Rome can assume the traits of a ritual. It never starts before 8pm, unless you consider an aperitivo first, and always lasts at least until 10pm. Dinner is possibly the single best way to catch up with friends and family, meet new people, develop professional networking and discover new eateries.

    It doesn't matter if it's cold, rainy or even snowing, dining out it's something essential. With the nearing of the good season, however, it's all the more pleasant as restaurants put their tables outdoor and you can dine surrounded by the architecture you admired during the day.

    In neighborhoods like Trastevere this is particularly enjoyable as every evening its streets and narrow alleys are a feast of people, tourists and locals alike, walking and relaxing after a day sightseeing or at work, or simply celebrating their weekend.
  • On April 15, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What is there to do at Villa Borghese in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias True green oasis in the hectic heart of Rome, Villa Borghese is one of the city's most famous parks, although not the biggest one. Popular among locals and tourists alike, there are plenty of activities Villa Borghese offers to its visitors.

    Being a huge public garden, apart from long walks immersed in nature, many people go there for running, walking their dogs and picnics, both during week days and weekends.

    Located in Rome's city center, Villa Borghese is also in line with the beauty of the area, so if you are a photographer, an art lover or simply an esthete, you will enjoy the marble fountains, monuments and sculptures scattered all around the park along with its many gardens and palaces.

    Apart from its outdoor activities, Villa Borghese also houses Rome's zoo, the Etruscan Museum of Villa Giulia, the beautiful National Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art (GNAM) in 131 Via delle Belle Arti and Galleria Borghese, in 5 Piazzale del Museo Borghese, showcasing masterpieces by artists of the likes of Raphael, Titian, Caravaggio, Canova and Gian Lorenzo Bernini.

    From the Pincio Terrace, easy to reach from Piazza di Spagna and Piazza del Popolo, you can stare at a gorgeous view of Piazza del Popolo and a wider one into Rome.

    Due to its size, Villa Borghese has many entrances, the easiest to find being from Piazza del Popolo, Piazzale Flaminio, Piazzale San Paolo del Brasile and Piazza di Spagna.
  • On April 8, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best food gifts to buy in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Whether you come to Rome for its historical attractions, nightlife or artwork, you will inevitably bring back home some gifts, and with the plethora of available options, food gifts are some of the most appreciated and easiest to carry.

    Truth be said, there are some local delicacies that are hard to carry on the airplane and only who is here can properly enjoy them, but this is the bonus for who travels: you want to real deal? You've got to come to Rome yourself. However, there are many food gifts well packaged to be shipped or carried in your luggage, so fret not, you will still be able to share some of your vacation pleasure with family and friends back home.

    Italy is famous all over the world for its gourmet food, and some of its products make for the perfect gift. Apart from artisan pasta, you can easily find mouthwatering truffle-based specialties such as truffle oil, sauces or in flakes, used for seasoning pasta dishes, much appreciated by gourmet food connoisseurs.

    Speaking of truffle, at the food shop Volpetti, in 47 Via Marmorata, in Testaccio area, you can buy an excellent truffle-seasoned pecorino cheese, apart from the original pecorino Romano, and other local delicacies such as sausages, fine balsamic vinegars, caviar, wines and coffee, also aptly packaged for traveling.

    Another great food gift is artisan chocolate. Apart from the most popular Italian brands such as Venchi and Caffarel, in Rome there are several artisan chocolatiers where you can buy just made chocolate in different flavors, from orange to strawberry to mint. In Monti area, in 82 Via Leonina, there is La Bottega del Cioccolato selling wonderful gifts made with delicious artisan chocolate in all shapes, from typical Carnival masks to sculptures such as the Colosseum and Saint Peter's basilica.
  • On April 8, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best food gifts to buy in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Whether you come to Rome for its historical attractions, nightlife or artwork, you will inevitably bring back home some gifts, and with the plethora of available options, food gifts are some of the most appreciated and easiest to carry.

    Truth be said, there are some local delicacies that are hard to carry on the airplane and only who is here can properly enjoy them, but this is the bonus for who travels: you want to real deal? You've got to come to Rome yourself. However, there are many food gifts well packaged to be shipped or carried in your luggage, so fret not, you will still be able to share some of your vacation pleasure with family and friends back home.

    Italy is famous all over the world for its gourmet food, and some of its products make for the perfect gift. Apart from artisan pasta, you can easily find mouthwatering truffle-based specialties such as truffle oil, sauces or in flakes, used for seasoning pasta dishes, much appreciated by gourmet food connoisseurs.

    Speaking of truffle, at the food shop Volpetti, in 47 Via Marmorata, in Testaccio area, you can buy an excellent truffle-seasoned pecorino cheese, apart from the original pecorino Romano, and other local delicacies such as sausages, fine balsamic vinegars, caviar, wines and coffee, also aptly packaged for traveling.

    Another great food gift is artisan chocolate. Apart from the most popular Italian brands such as Venchi and Caffarel, in Rome there are several artisan chocolatiers where you can buy just made chocolate in different flavors, from orange to strawberry to mint. In Monti area, in 82 Via Leonina, there is La Bottega del Cioccolato selling wonderful gifts made with delicious artisan chocolate in all shapes, from typical Carnival masks to sculptures such as the Colosseum and Saint Peter's basilica.
  • On April 1, 2013
    Angela Corrias is now following Kevin Hostler
  • On April 1, 2013
    Kevin Hostler is now following Angela Corrias
  • On March 31, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best places for gelato in Rome?

    Eating a gelato in Rome is not just a sensory feast, it's a ritual, very much cherished by tourists and locals alike. You can find a good ice cream all over the city, however, there are some heavenly places that will make your treat a memorable experience.

    After you visit Piazza Navona and the Pantheon, stopping at Giolitti is almost inevitable. This gelateria is one of the oldest and most popular in Rome, and their gelato is delicious. They showcase a huge array of flavors and the line of waiting customers is ever-present, any season, at any time of the day.

    But it's not the only, nor the best, ice cream shop in the capital.

    If you are a fan of artisan gelato that can almost be compared to an art masterpiece, head to Procopio, either its shop in Piazza Re di Roma, near the metro station, or its new opening in Via Avezzana, near Piazza Mazzini in Prati area. Here, apart from always new flavors, you will have season treats coming from local produce.

    Great places for gelato are also Gelateria dei Gracchi, in 272 Via dei Gracchi, famous for its zabaione, cioccolato fondente (dark chocolate), pistachio, apple and cinnamon flavors, and the Old Bridge, in 5 Viale Bastioni di Michelangelo, just across the Vatican Walls, selling a good artisan gelato.

    Worth a mention is GROM, a new chain making bio ice cream. They have shops all over Italy and six only in Rome, the most central being in 53 Via dei Giubbonari, near Campo de' Fiori, 30A Via della Maddalena and 3 Via Agonale, near Piazza Navona. GROM's gelato is made with very high quality products, only fresh, season fruit, spring water, fresh milk, no artificial color nor chemical additive. Some of their most popular flavors are lemon from Amalfi, peach from Leonforte, pistachio from Bronte.
  • On March 30, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What would be a perfect date night in Rome?

    Who says Paris is the most romantic European capital has obviously never walked along the Tevere River after sunset to enjoy the stunning panorama of lights flitting on the calm waters.

    If you want to impress, start your date late afternoon strolling around the city to one of the many places that offer breathtaking views, such as the cozy Giardino degli Aranci, on the Aventino Hill, where you can stare at a beautiful vista on the city, on the Gianicolo terrace, where you can wait for a gorgeous sunset on Rome's iconic cityscape, or at the famous Zodiaco, belvedere in Viale del Parco Mellini, where you can enjoy a view on the whole city and on clear days even reach the panorama of the Castelli Romani.

    For dinner, you have a huge choice of romantic restaurants.

    If you are at the Zodiaco belvedere, you can stop for dinner at the Zodiaco restaurant, just beside Monte Mario's astronomical observatory, to enjoy a traditional Roman meal with the beautiful night view in the background.

    If you prefer staying in the city center, a stroll on any of the Tevere's bridges will lead you to Trastevere neighborhood, Rome's heart and soul, where you will be spoiled for choice on where to go for dinner. For delicious fish-based dishes, with also a good selection of vegetarian options, head to 24 Via del Moro and grab a table at the trendy Bisque Restaurant. After dinner, take in Trastevere's exciting nightlife and round off your evening with a drink at any of the cozy local pubs enjoying a live jazz concert.
  • On March 30, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best local dishes in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Rome's typical food comes from a tradition of simple, poor dishes. Very tasty and made with local produce, Rome's cuisine greatly matches its people's character, genuine, bold and full-bodied.

    As Italian routine suggests, also in Rome you will have an antipasto (starter), il primo (a first main course), il secondo (second main course) and the dessert, il dolce.

    As a starter, you can order from a wide range of sausages, often borrowed from neighboring regions, olives, small pies with different types of veggies, and bruschetta (toasted bread) with tomato or a topping of fava bean and chicory cream or porcini mushroom cream.

    The most famous “primo” is bucatini all'amatriciana, a type of spaghetti served with a chilli sauce made with tomato and guanciale, the pig cheek. Apart from the amatriciana, Roman chefs suggest rigatoni con la pajata, dish of very ancient tradition made with rigatoni pasta in a sauce with tomato and veal intestines, and tonnarelli cacio e pepe, pasta with pepper and pecorino romano cheese.

    As a second main course you can order saltimbocca alla Romana, pan-fried veal cutlets with a sage leaf on top, white wine and pepper, coda alla vaccinara, veal tail stewed with a mix of veggies, and abbacchio alla cacciatora, pan-fried lamb with rosemary, sage, pepper and vinegar.

    Too much meat for vegetarians? Fret not, Rome has a wide choice of veggie-based dishes thanks to the huge array of season produce that colors grocery markets, from the green hues of the deliciously bitter cime di rapa (turnip tops), agretti, a type of vegetable with very thin, threadlike leaves to be eaten steamed or as a salad with oil and lemon dressing, chicory and Roman broccoli, to the orange shades of autumn pumpkins.

    Some of the most famous, and my favorite, veggie dishes are the gnocchi with turnip tops, pasta with tartufi, truffle sauce, carciofi alla giudia, fried artichokes with salt and pepper, and carciofi alla Romana, braised artichokes with a filling of mixed herbs.

    Roman culinary tradition also boasts delicious pastries, such as maritozzi, soft pastries filled with whipped cream, and frappe, crumbly, fried pastries typical of Carnival period.

    For every meal, there's the perfect wine: Castelli Romani, Frascati, and wines from the Colli Albani are among the most appreciated.
  • On March 29, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What is public transportation like in Rome?

    Public transportation in Rome can be nerve-racking. It's not unusual to wait for a long time for a bus, and while the subway is very frequent, the city is served by only two metro lines, making it hard sometimes to get to neighborhoods in the outskirts. The city center is well served by many bus routes, so tourists will find it easy to move from an area to another.

    One of the most popular buses downtown is number 64, connecting the main train station Termini to San Pietro Station and going past all the main tourist draws such as Piazza Venezia, Largo Argentina, Piazza Navona, Campo de' Fiori and the Vatican. Since this bus is indeed very handy to get about historic areas, it's very popular among tourists, so it's recommended to be very careful and keep your valuables always close at hand as pickpockets are pretty active.

    The two metro lines, A and B (or red and blue), serve the city center, with only line B reaching the more residential district of Eur. The local council has been trying to build the third metro line for ages, and although Italian administration is notoriously slow, it's a fact that every time workers start digging some new ruins dating back Roman or Etruscan times come to light, causing yet another halt and leading proud Romans to be more patients in the wait for this much needed line C.

    The metro lines intersect at Termini Station, where is also a huge bus station with buses connecting to many areas of the city. Bus stops along the streets are very consumer-friendly, with big signs showing what buses travel there and their respective routes.

    The company managing buses, metro and tram is Atac, and their website has daily updates and useful tools such as an efficient route planner.

    Rome is also served by overground trains serving important hubs such as Ostiense and Trastevere, from where you can take the train to Fiumicino Airport. On these trains, even though operated by Trenitalia, passengers can use the same ticket valid for buses and subway.

    A single ticket costs €1.5 and can be used for one metro trip, one train trip and unlimited bus trips within 100 minutes from the first validation. There are also other options that can save you some money if you think you will use public transport often: a daily ticket valid until midnight on the day of validation will cost you 6€, a three-day ticket is €16.50, a weekly ticket costs 24€ and 35€ buys you a monthly pass.

    Tickets can be bought at metro stations, newsstands, bars and small stores selling also phone cards and cigarettes. You can easily spot them as they usually show the typical black-and-white sign “Sali e Tabacchi”.
  • On March 26, 2013

    My tips on how to make the most of your visit to the Vatican in Rome http://www.forbestravelguide.com/rome-italy/what-is-the-best-way-to-see-the-vatican-in-rome

  • On March 26, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What is the best way to see the Vatican in Rome?

    The most popular places within the Vatican walls are the imposing Saint Peter's Basilica and the Vatican Museums, with its Sistine Chapel being the main tourist draw. While both of them teem with tourists every day, the Vatican's huge size allows everybody to enjoy its artwork properly and stare in awe at its vast sample of human creativity.

    Christmas, Easter and the summer months are the busiest times to visit the Vatican, and during the day late morning and early afternoon are the times when crowds concentrate, but if you go early morning or later in the afternoon it will be calmer and you will have the basilica almost to yourself. Almost.

    The Vatican Museums are also always packed with tourists, but don't let the long queue at the entrance put you off as their ticket system is very efficient and the line gets sorted out pretty quickly. Visiting times are Monday to Saturday 9am to 6pm, while ticket office closes at 4pm. Sunday is closed, except the last Sunday of every month when entrance is free. Full ticket costs 16€, reduced 8€ and for schools 4€. To skip the queue you can buy the ticket online.

    You can visit the Museums either independently or with a tour guide. Vatican Group Tours conducted by official Vatican guides cost 32€, while the reduced ticket is 24€. Tickets include admission to the Museums, guided tour and rental of audio-guides. Apart from the Sistine Chapel, the tour will show you also other artwork, such as the Pio Clementino Museum (classical antiquity), the Gallery of the Candelabras, the Gallery of the Tapestries and the Gallery of the Geographical Maps (Renaissance Art) and the Raphael Rooms. You can choose different itineraries, depending on what you want to visit with the aid of a guide, including the Vatican Gardens, the Basilica and archaeological areas.

    Along with the Vatican Museums, the Basilica and the gorgeous Dome (Cupola), it's also possible to visit underground Saint Peter, beneath the Basilica's central nave, where lie previous popes' tombs and Saint Peter's relics, placed right underneath the main altar. Near the tombs, visitors have also access to the Museo Storico Artistico where religious ancient artwork is kept. Access to the Popes' Tombs and the Museum is free of charge and follows the same opening hours than the Basilica.

    The Vatican organization offers also other types of tours and educational activities, such as Animated Educational Tours, Didactic Labs, Family ToursTours for the Visually Impaired, Tours for the Deaf and Educational Tours with the possibility to choose specific itineraries.