Leanne Mirandilla

Correspondent

  • Hong Kong, China, Asia

Leanne Mirandilla is a correspondent who lives in Hong Kong and covers the city for Forbes Travel Guide. She is a staff writer at HK Magazine, a weekly lifestyle publication and proclaimed Hong Kong city-living authority, and the associate editor of The List, a local, biweekly how-to magazine. Having grown up in Hong Kong, she left for the States to attend Dartmouth College before returning to the city she calls home, where she enjoys soaking up culture and sampling the various delicious cuisines. Her work has also appeared in Where Hong Kong and RAW Magazine.

  • On March 12, 2013
    Shannan Finke is now following Leanne Mirandilla
  • On March 11, 2013
  • On March 8, 2013
    Kevin Hostler is now following Leanne Mirandilla
  • On March 2, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What new dance shows are in Hong Kong?

    Two of the most well-known and quality dance troupes in the city are the Hong Kong Ballet and the Hong Kong Dance Company, which does many performances that involve giving modern, innovative twists to traditional Chinese dance.

    The Hong Kong Ballet's biggest upcoming show is "The Sleeping Beauty", staged by Cynthia Harvey, running through March 15-17 with tickets going for HK$120-300; and the Hong Kong Dance Company is collaborating with the Hong Kong Ballet to produce "Drama: Dance", which will blend Eastern and Western styles of dance and serve as an experimental platform for up-and-coming choreographers. Runs from March 23-24 with tickets priced at HK$120 each.
  • On March 2, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What are the best festivals in Hong Kong?

    Hong Kong is home to plenty of traditional local festivals, including but not limited to:

    Chinese New Year: On a different day every year (following the Lunar Calendar), but typically in late January or early February, there's always plenty going on the week of Chinese New Year, from lion dances to flower markets overloaded with lucky plum blossoms to a firework display on the actual new year's day. Restaurants around the city are bound to have special Chinese New Year feasts and promotions on offer, as well.

    Dragon Boat Festival: Based on the legend that the poet Qu Yuan committed suicide in a river after being accused of treason, the Dragon Boat Festival commemorates his death by emulating the boats dropped sticky rice triangles into the river, so that the fish would eat the rice rather than his body. While there is no rice-triangle-dropping during the Dragon Boat Festival, teams of dragon boat racers row against each other, and the races are all open to spectators.

    Mid-Autumn Festival: Historically held in celebration of harvest season and occuring in late September or early October, Mid-Autumn festival occurs when there is a full moon. Families and friends take to the city parks with lanterns and eat mooncakes. Fire dragon dances are held in Tai Hang, as well.
  • On March 2, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What are the best festivals in Hong Kong?

    Hong Kong is home to plenty of traditional local festivals, including but not limited to:

    Chinese New Year: On a different day every year (following the Lunar Calendar), but typically in late January or early February, there's always plenty going on the week of Chinese New Year, from lion dances to flower markets overloaded with lucky plum blossoms to a firework display on the actual new year's day. Restaurants around the city are bound to have special Chinese New Year feasts and promotions on offer, as well.

    Dragon Boat Festival: Based on the legend that the poet Qu Yuan committed suicide in a river after being accused of treason, the Dragon Boat Festival commemorates his death by emulating the boats dropped sticky rice triangles into the river, so that the fish would eat the rice rather than his body. While there is no rice-triangle-dropping during the Dragon Boat Festival, teams of dragon boat racers row against each other, and the races are all open to spectators.

    Mid-Autumn Festival: Historically held in celebration of harvest season and occuring in late September or early October, Mid-Autumn festival occurs when there is a full moon. Families and friends take to the city parks with lanterns and eat mooncakes. Fire dragon dances are held in certain parks, as well.
  • On March 2, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    Where is the best shopping in Hong Kong?

    Considering that shopping is jokingly referred to as a national pastime, you'll find good shopping in most of the central hubs in the city--some districts have shopping malls on practically every street.

    Central is home to several upscale malls, including IFC, Prince's Building and The Landmark--which includes Landmark Men on the basement level, where you'll find everything from male-specific spas and barbershops to pop-up whiskey shops. In Admiralty, the next district over, you'll find more luxury shopping at Pacific Place and newly opened fashion mecca LAB Concept.

    If malls aren't your thing, visit nearby Sheung Wan and browse through cute little boutiques on Gough Street, Tai Ping Shan Street or Po Hing Fong, including unique brands like Austrailan fashion brand Sambag, local hand-made accessories shop Squarestreet and lifestyle design store Konzepp. Plenty of little cafes and eateries are dotted around, as well, such as tea specialist Teakha, Cafe Deadend, Kisses Cupcakes and a noodle shop that sells (arguably) the best beef brisket noodles in town.
  • On March 2, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What are the best attractions in Hong Kong?

    Ten Thousand Buddhas Monastery. Photo by Joey Ewen. There are plenty of sights to see in Hong Kong, from the historical to the glitzy, but out of the wealth of options there are a few that you shouldn't miss:

    Street markets: From the Flower Market and Goldfish Market in Mong Kok to the nighttime Temple Street Market lined with dai pai dongs (old-school local eateries, often with street-side seating) and fortune tellers, there are all sorts of street markets in the city. Pick up a souvenir or two and practice your bargaining skills; and even if you're not in the mood for shopping, they still make for an interesting experience.

    Tai O: Nicknamed "Venice of the East", Tai O may be a little out of the way (2 hours if you take the train and then a bus), but the waterside village is one of the last few remaining spots that preserves Hong Kong's history as a fishing village. In addition to being peaceful with gorgeous views, it's also home to the Tai O Heritage Hotel, a market, and plenty of fresh local food.

    Ten Thousand Buddhas Monastery: While not technically a monastery, as no monks live there, the five halls showcase beautiful architecture and, as the name may suggests, almost 13,000 buddha statues in various sizes.
  • On March 2, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What are the best attractions in Hong Kong?

    Ten Thousand Buddhas Monastery. Photo by Joey Ewen. There are plenty of sights to see in Hong Kong, from the historical to the glitzy, but out of the wealth of options there are a few that you shouldn't miss:

    Street markets: From the Flower Market and Goldfish Market in Mong Kok to the nighttime Temple Street Market lined with dai pai dongs (old-school local eateries, often with street-side seating) and fortune tellers, there are all sorts of street markets in the city. Pick up a souvenir or two and practice your bargaining skills; and even if you're not in the mood for shopping, they still make for an interesting experience.

    Tai O: Nicknamed "Venice of the East", Tai O may be a little out of the way (2 hours if you take the train and then a bus), but the waterside village is one of the last few remaining spots that preserves Hong Kong's history as a fishing village. In addition to being peaceful with gorgeous views, it's also home to the Tai O Heritage Hotel, a market, and plenty of fresh local food.

    Ten Thousand Buddhas Monastery: While not technically a monastery, as no monks live there, the five halls showcase beautiful architecture and, as the name may suggests, almost 13,000 buddha statues in various sizes.
  • On March 2, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What are the best attractions in Hong Kong?

    Ten Thousand Buddhas Monastery. Photo by Joey Ewen. There are plenty of sights to see in Hong Kong, from the historical to the glitzy, but out of the wealth of options there are a few that you shouldn't miss:

    Street markets: From the Flower Market and Goldfish Market in Mong Kok to the nighttime Temple Street Market lined with dai pai dongs (old-school local eateries, often with street-side seating) and fortune tellers, there are all sorts of street markets in the city. Pick up a souvenir or two and practice your bargaining skills; and even if you're not in the mood for shopping, they still make for an interesting experience.

    Tai O: Nicknamed "Venice of the East", Tai O may be a little out of the way (2 hours if you take the train and then a bus), but the waterside village is one of the last few remaining spots that preserves Hong Kong's history as a fishing village. In addition to being peaceful with gorgeous views, it's also home to the Tai O Heritage Hotel, a market, and plenty of fresh local food.

    Ten Thousand Buddhas Monastery: While not technically a monastery, as no monks live there, the five halls showcase beautiful architecture and, as the name may suggests, almost 13,000 buddha statues in various sizes.
  • On March 2, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What are the best attractions in Hong Kong?

    Ten Thousand Buddhas Monastery. Photo by Joey Ewen. There are plenty of sights to see in Hong Kong, from the historical to the glitzy, but out of the wealth of options there are a few that you shouldn't miss:

    Street markets: From the Flower Market and Goldfish Market in Mong Kok to the nighttime Temple Street Market lined with dai pai dongs (old-school local eateries, often with street-side seating) and fortune tellers, there are all sorts of street markets in the city. Pick up a souvenir or two and practice your bargaining skills; and even if you're not in the mood for shopping, they still make for an interesting experience.

    Tai O: Nicknamed "Venice of the East", Tai O may be a little out of the way (2 hours if you take the train and then a bus), but the waterside village is one of the last few remaining spots that preserves Hong Kong's history as a fishing village. In addition to being peaceful with gorgeous views, it's also home to the Tai O Heritage Hotel, a market, and plenty of fresh local food.

    Ten Thousand Buddhas Monastery: While not technically a monastery, as no monks live there, the five halls showcase beautiful architecture and, as the name may suggests, almost 13,000 buddha statues in various sizes.
  • On March 2, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What are the best tours of Hong Kong?

    Photography Walk, courtesy of Secret Tour HK As such a compact city, Hong Kong is refreshingly easy to navigate via public transport and on foot. So if you'd rather be on the ground and exploring the city rather than sitting pretty in a coach getting ferried from location to location, here are some of the city's best walking tour groups:

    Jason's Walks: Perfect for history buffs, these tours are tun by local published historian and writer Jason Wordie. Having lived in the city for over 20 years, Wordie runs walking tours covering places like Western District, where the British flag was first raised when the city was a colony; the battlements and bunkers that were used during WWII; and the old clan halls and walled villages of the New Territories. Tours take 10-26 people and cost anywhere from HK$350 to HK$700 per person, depending on the walk. Private bookings can be made as well.

    Secret Tour Hong Kong: A relatively young tour series started up by friends Stephen Chung and Josie Cheng, who were looking for an interestnig pastime outside of work, Secret Tour HK (pictured) plans trips that are dedicated to introducing people to lesser-known sides of the city. From tours raising awareness about the city's to tours of the industrial-turned-artsy Kwun Tong district (including artist's studios, music performing venues and even an unconventionally decorated tattoo parlor), you can be sure to expect the unexpected from this tour group. Public tours are booked full really quick; but private bookings can be made, as well. Regular tours cost HK$700 each.

    Walk Hong Kong: The group at Walk Hong Kong have a pool of expertise between them, from photography to bird-watching, and have been running guided tours and hikes since 2003. Sign up for one of their many nature walks or hikes, or check out one of their heritage walks if nature isn't your thing. French and German guided talks are also available. Regular tours cost HK$450 to HK$800, while private tours cost HK$2,000 for a full day.
  • On March 2, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What are the best tours of Hong Kong?

    Photography Walk, courtesy of Secret Tour HK As such a compact city, Hong Kong is refreshingly easy to navigate via public transport and on foot. So if you'd rather be on the ground and exploring the city rather than sitting pretty in a coach getting ferried from location to location, here are some of the city's best walking tour groups:

    Jason's Walks: Perfect for history buffs, these tours are tun by local published historian and writer Jason Wordie. Having lived in the city for over 20 years, Wordie runs walking tours covering places like Western District, where the British flag was first raised when the city was a colony; the battlements and bunkers that were used during WWII; and the old clan halls and walled villages of the New Territories. Tours take 10-26 people and cost anywhere from HK$350 to HK$700 per person, depending on the walk. Private bookings can be made as well.

    Secret Tour Hong Kong: A relatively young tour series started up by friends Stephen Chung and Josie Cheng, who were looking for an interestnig pastime outside of work, Secret Tour HK (pictured) plans trips that are dedicated to introducing people to lesser-known sides of the city. From tours raising awareness about the city's to tours of the industrial-turned-artsy Kwun Tong district (including artist's studios, music performing venues and even an unconventionally decorated tattoo parlor), you can be sure to expect the unexpected from this tour group. Public tours are booked full really quick; but private bookings can be made, as well. Regular tours cost HK$700 each.

    Walk Hong Kong: The group at Walk Hong Kong have a pool of expertise between them, from photography to bird-watching, and have been running guided tours and hikes since 2003. Sign up for one of their many nature walks or hikes, or check out one of their heritage walks if nature isn't your thing. French and German guided talks are also available. Regular tours cost HK$450 to HK$800, while private tours cost HK$2,000 for a full day.
  • On March 2, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What are the best tours of Hong Kong?

    Photography Walk, courtesy of Secret Tour HK As such a compact city, Hong Kong is refreshingly easy to navigate via public transport and on foot. So if you'd rather be on the ground and exploring the city rather than sitting pretty in a coach getting ferried from location to location, here are some of the city's best walking tour groups:

    Jason's Walks: Perfect for history buffs, these tours are tun by local published historian and writer Jason Wordie. Having lived in the city for over 20 years, Wordie runs walking tours covering places like Western District, where the British flag was first raised when the city was a colony; the battlements and bunkers that were used during WWII; and the old clan halls and walled villages of the New Territories. Tours take 10-26 people and cost anywhere from HK$350 to HK$700 per person, depending on the walk. Private bookings can be made as well.

    Secret Tour Hong Kong: A relatively young tour series started up by friends Stephhen Chung and Josie Cheng, who were looking for an interestnig pastime outside of work, Secret Tour HK plans trips that are dedicated to introducing people to lesser-known sides of the city. From tours raising awareness about the city's to tours of the industrial-turned-artsy Kwun Tong district (including artist's studios, music performing venues and even an unconventionally decorated tattoo parlor), you can be sure to expect the unexpected from this tour group. Public tours are booked full really quick; but private bookings can be made, as well. Regular tours cost HK$700 each.

    Walk Hong Kong: The group at Walk Hong Kong have a pool of expertise between them, from photography to bird-watching, and have been running guided tours and hikes since 2003. Sign up for one of their many nature walks or hikes, or check out one of their heritage walks if nature isn't your thing. French and German guided talks are also available. Regular tours cost HK$450 to HK$800, while private tours cost HK$2,000 for a full day.
  • On March 2, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What are the best tours of Hong Kong?

    Photography Walk, courtesy of Secret Tour HK As such a compact city, Hong Kong is refreshingly easy to navigate via public transport and on foot. So if you'd rather be on the ground and exploring the city rather than sitting pretty in a coach getting ferried from location to location, here are some of the city's best walking tour groups:

    Jason's Walks: Perfect for history buffs, these tours are tun by local published historian and writer Jason Wordie. Having lived in the city for over 20 years, Wordie runs walking tours covering places like Western District, where the British flag was first raised when the city was a colony; the battlements and bunkers that were used during WWII; and the old clan halls and walled villages of the New Territories. Tours take 10-26 people and cost anywhere from HK$350 to HK$700 per person, depending on the walk. Private bookings can be made as well.

    Secret Tour Hong Kong: A relatively young tour series started up by friends Stephhen Chung and Josie Cheng, who were looking for an interestnig pastime outside of work, Secret Tour HK plans trips that are dedicated to introducing people to lesser-known sides of the city. From tours raising awareness about the city's to tours of the industrial-turned-artsy Kwun Tong district (including artist's studios, music performing venues and even an unconventionally decorated tatoo parlor), you can be sure to expect the unexpected from this tour group. Public tours are booked full really quick; but private bookings can be made, as well. Regular tours cost HK$700 each.

    Walk Hong Kong: The group at Walk Hong Kong have a pool of expertise between them, from photography to bird-watching, and have been running guided tours and hikes since 2003. Sign up for one of their many nature walks or hikes, or check out one of their heritage walks if nature isn't your thing. French and German guided talks are also available. Regular tours cost HK$450 to HK$800, while private tours cost HK$2,000 for a full day.