Leanne Mirandilla

Correspondent

  • Hong Kong, China, Asia

Leanne Mirandilla is a correspondent who lives in Hong Kong and covers the city for Forbes Travel Guide. She is a staff writer at HK Magazine, a weekly lifestyle publication and proclaimed Hong Kong city-living authority, and the associate editor of The List, a local, biweekly how-to magazine. Having grown up in Hong Kong, she left for the States to attend Dartmouth College before returning to the city she calls home, where she enjoys soaking up culture and sampling the various delicious cuisines. Her work has also appeared in Where Hong Kong and RAW Magazine.

  • On March 2, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What are the best tours of Hong Kong?

    Photography Walk, courtesy of Secret Tour HK As such a compact city, Hong Kong is refreshingly easy to navigate via public transport and on foot. So if you'd rather be on the ground and exploring the city rather than sitting pretty in a coach getting ferried from location to location, here are some of the city's best walking tour groups:

    Jason Wordie: Perfect for history buffs, these tours are tun by local published historian and writer Jason Wordie. Having lived in the city for over 20 years, Wordie runs walking tours covering places like Western District, where the British flag was first raised when the city was a colony; the battlements and bunkers that were used during WWII; and the old clan halls and walled villages of the New Territories. Tours take 10-26 people and cost anywhere from HK$350 to HK$700 per person, depending on the walk. Private bookings can be made as well.

    Secret Tour Hong Kong: A relatively young tour series started up by friends Stephhen Chung and Josie Cheng, who were looking for an interestnig pastime outside of work, Secret Tour HK plans trips that are dedicated to introducing people to lesser-known sides of the city. From tours raising awareness about the city's to tours of the industrial-turned-artsy Kwun Tong district (including artist's studios, music performing venues and even an unconventionally decorated tatoo parlor), you can be sure to expect the unexpected from this tour group. Public tours are booked full really quick; but private bookings can be made, as well. Regular tours cost HK$700 each.

    Walk Hong Kong: The group at Walk Hong Kong have a pool of expertise between them, from photography to bird-watching, and have been running guided tours and hikes since 2003. Sign up for one of their many nature walks or hikes, or check out one of their heritage walks if nature isn't your thing. French and German guided talks are also available. Regular tours cost HK$450 to HK$800, while private tours cost HK$2,000 for a full day.
  • On February 28, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What are the best local dishes in Hong Kong?

    Among the many different types of cuisines on offer, don't forget to try some delicious local classics while you're here, as well. Most notable dishes fall into the following categories:

    Dim Sum: You can't come to Hong Kong without going for dim sum (pictured) at least once. Consisting of dumplings, buns, pan-fried foods, and plenty of other dishes cooked and served in bamboo steamers, you'll be able to find dim sum presented in all kinds of ways, from being wheeled on trollies from table to table in old-school, hole-in-the-walls to sprinkled with gold flakes at high-end, Michelin-starred establishments. Some examples of dim sum include char siu bao (barbeque pork bun), har gao (shrimp dumplings), xiao long bao (Shanghainese-style pork dumplings) and chicken feet.

    Hot Pot: While not unique to Hong Kong specifically, everyone enjoys sitting around the bubbling broth once cooler weather hits. Hot pot typically consists of a variety of soup bases with plenty of raw ingredients diners cook themselves by putting them into the pot which sits over a hot plate. Typical ingredients include seafood and beef balls, thin cut slices of meat, plenty of vegetables, and even more innovative options depending on where you go.

    Meat, meat, meat: ...from lap cheung (preserved sausage) to char siu (barbeque pork) to crispy pork belly to beef brisket noodles. You'll often see lap cheung or various roasted meats--including poultry, as well--on display in the front the windows of various local shops and restaurants.

    Pastries: The city has its own distinct style of bakeries, with classic tasty offerings such as egg tarts (a tart with an egg custard filling), pineapple bun (crisp and sweet outside with a sticky filling) and wife cake (more savory than sweet, with a filling of almond paste and winter melon and an exterior made flaky with pork lard). Have a cup of Hong Kong-style milk tea with your snack to complete the experience.

    Seafood: While little of the culture remains, Hong Kong did make its beginnings as a humble fishing village. Head to Aberdeen, Lamma Island or the waterfront of Sai Kung for a veritable seafood feasts; you'll be able to see the fish and shellfish in tanks in many of these establishments--that's just how fresh they are. Don't miss hairy crab season in the fall, where dishes featuring the crustaceans turn up in restaurants all over the city.
  • On February 28, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What are the best local dishes in Hong Kong?

    Among the many different types of cuisines on offer, don't forget to try some delicious local classics while you're here, as well. Most notable dishes fall into the following categories:

    Dim Sum: You can't come to Hong Kong without going for dim sum (pictured) at least once. Consisting of dumplings, buns, pan-fried foods, and plenty of other dishes cooked and served in bamboo steamers, you'll be able to find dim sum presented in all kinds of ways, from being wheeled on trollies from table to table in old-school, hole-in-the-walls to sprinkled with gold flakes at high-end, Michelin-starred establishments. Some examples of dim sum include char siu bao (barbeque pork bun), har gao (shrimp dumplings), xiao long bao (Shanghainese-style pork dumplings) and chicken feet.

    Hot Pot: While not unique to Hong Kong specifically, everyone enjoys sitting around the bubbling broth once cooler weather hits. Hot pot typically consists of a variety of soup bases with plenty of raw ingredients diners cook themselves by putting them into the pot which sits over a hot plate. Typical ingredients include seafood and beef balls, thin cut slices of meat, plenty of vegetables, and even more innovative options depending on where you go.

    Meat, meat, meat: ...from lap cheung (preserved sausage) to char siu (barbequed pork) to crispy pork belly to beef brisket noodles. You'll often see lap cheung or various roasted meats--including poultry, as well--on display in the front the windows of various local shops and restaurants.

    Pastries: The city has its own distinct style of bakeries, with classic tasty offerings such as egg tarts (a tart with an egg custard filling), pineapple bun (crisp and sweet outside with a sticky filling) and wife cake (more savory than sweet, with a filling of almond paste and winter melon and an exterior made flaky with pork lard). Have a cup of Hong Kong-style milk tea with your snack to complete the experience.

    Seafood: While little of the culture remains, Hong Kong did make its beginnings as a humble fishing village. Head to Aberdeen, Lamma Island or the waterfront of Sai Kung for a veritable seafood feasts; you'll be able to see the fish and shellfish in tanks in many of these establishments--that's just how fresh they are. Don't miss hairy crab season in the fall, where dishes featuring the crustaceans turn up in restaurants all over the city.
  • On February 28, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What are the best local dishes in Hong Kong?

    Among the many different types of cuisines on offer, don't forget to try some delicious local classics while you're here, as well. Most notable dishes fall into the following categories:

    Dim Sum: You can't come to Hong Kong without going for dim sum (pictured) at least once. Consisting of dumplings, buns, pan-friend foods, and plenty of other dishes cooked and served in bamboo steamers, you'll be able to find dim sum presented in all kinds of ways, from being wheeled on trollies from table to table in old-school, hole-in-the-walls to sprinkled with gold flakes at high-end, Michelin-starred establishments. Some examples of dim sum include char siu bao (barbeque pork bun), har gao (shrimp dumplings), xiao long bao (Shanghainese-style pork dumplings) and chicken feet.

    Hot Pot: While not unique to Hong Kong specifically, everyone enjoys sitting around the bubbling broth once cooler weather hits. Hot pot typically consists of a variety of soup bases with plenty of raw ingredients diners cook themselves by putting them into the pot which sits over a hot plate. Typical ingredients include seafood and beef balls, thin cut slices of meat, plenty of vegetables, and even more innovative options depending on where you go.

    Meat, meat, meat: ...from lap cheung (preserved sausage) to char siu (barbequed pork) to crispy pork belly to beef brisket noodles. You'll often see lap cheung or various roasted meats--including poultry, as well--on display in the front the windows of various local shops and restaurants.

    Pastries: The city has its own distinct style of bakeries, with classic tasty offerings such as egg tarts (a tart with an egg custard filling), pineapple bun (crisp and sweet outside with a sticky filling) and wife cake (more savory than sweet, with a filling of almond paste and winter melon and an exterior made flaky with pork lard). Have a cup of Hong Kong-style milk tea with your snack to complete the experience.

    Seafood: While little of the culture remains, Hong Kong did make its beginnings as a humble fishing village. Head to Aberdeen, Lamma Island or the waterfront of Sai Kung for a veritable seafood feasts; you'll be able to see the fish and shellfish in tanks in many of these establishments--that's just how fresh they are. Don't miss hairy crab season in the fall, where dishes featuring the crustaceans turn up in restaurants all over the city.
  • On February 28, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What are the best rooftop bars in Hong Kong?

    Courtesy of Mamoz Rise above the hustle and bustle at one of these high-up, al fresco terrace and rooftop bars around the city.

    Armani/Prive: Mostly frequented by local banker-slash-lawyer types, this bar's interior may be nothing out of the ordinary... but step out onto the terrace and it's a whole different story. Only a short walk away from nightlife hub Lan Kwai Fong, Armani/Prive provides a nice break from the crowds. Enjoy the chilled-out music and woodsy decor--complete with plants growing in the terrace wall--while enjoying an Asian-inspired cocktail or glass of wine.

    Hooray Bar: This laid-back bar in Causeway Bay has a fifth floor terrace with a stellar view, and serves casual yet quality eats like pizza and surf 'n' turf barbeque. A good spot for a nightcap after taking advatnage of the districts many boutiques and shopping malls.

    Mamoz: Also located in Causeway Bay, Mamoz (pictured) is on the 27th and 28th floors of Cubus, which is filled with plenty of other high-end bars and restaurants. Hold off the sense of vertigo while standing on its glass floor or soaking up the view through the full-length windows on the first floor, or head up to its rooftop terrace. The bar serves up fancy bar tapas and understated yet exquisite cocktails like favorites the Clover Leaf and the Fancy Cider, or even the Tear Rock (which is served in an ice sculpture) if you're feeling adventurous. Live DJs on weekends.

    Ozone: Ozone is about as high as you can go--located at the top of the tallest hotel in the world (on the 118th floor, to be specific), this bar is nothing to sniff at. Enjoy views of the harbour from the balcony over Asian-inspired snacks and a cocktail.

    Wooloomooloo Prime: Part of the Wooloomooloo collective of Australian-style steakhouses, with branches across the city including in Central and Wan Chai, Wooloomooloo Prime is on the 21st floor of Tsim Sha Tsui mall The One. Its terrace provides sweeping views of Victoria Harbour, Hong Kong Island and Tsim Sha Tsui which you can enjoy over a steak or some seafood along with a classic cocktail.
  • On February 28, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What are the best restaurants in Hong Kong?

    Courtesy of Cafe Deco Group With over 15,000 dining establishments in the city, you'll have more than enough to pick from no matter what you're in the mood for; the difficulty here might be picking a restaurant to begin with! To help you out, here are just a few of the best spots Hong Kong has to offer:

    Best Brunch: As its name suggests, Top Deck (pictured) is located at the top of the Jumbo Kingdom collective of floating restaurants in Aberdeen. Serving a combination of Western and Asian fare, the 9,000 square foot al fresco space is well-known for its weekend champagne brunch.

    Best American: ...Cajun food, to be specific. Magnolia is a private kitchens where all reservations need to be pre-booked; guests are ushered into a sitting room for cocktails and canapes before being seated in a homey dining room where they'll enjoy a multi-course menu of offerings from gumbo to barbequed ribs to pecan pie. BYOB, no corkage fee. Parties of ten or more can enjoy a private room.

    Best Hot Pot: Megan's Kitchen is a cut above other hot pot joints with its innovative soup bases--including the likes of tomato and crab soup with a souffle finish--and wide selection of seafood and beef; in fact, it offers different cuts of beef from all over the world. Other Cantonese dishes are on offer as well as wines and liquors from China and Japan. The space leans towards the western-inspired in terms of decor, and includes several VIP rooms.

    Best Cantonese: The only restaurant to receive three stars in the first Michelin Guide to Hong Kong, Lung King Heen is a luxurious table with a great view at the Four Seasons. Expect all the classics like dim sum and mango pudding--along with a couple of western twists--made with the very best of ingredients.
  • On February 28, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What are the best rooftop bars in Hong Kong?

    Courtesy of Mamoz Rise above the hustle and bustle at one of these high-up, al fresco terrace and rooftop bars around the city.

    Armani/Prive: Mostly frequented by local banker-slash-lawyer types, this bar's interior may be nothing out of the ordinary... but step out onto the terrace and it's a whole different story. Only a short walk away from nightlife hub Lan Kwai Fong, Armani/Prive provides a nice break from the crowds. Enjoy the chilled-out music and woodsy decor--complete with plants growing in the terrace wall--while enjoying an Asian-inspired cocktail or glass of wine.

    Hooray Bar: This laid-back bar in Causeway Bay has a fifth floor terrace with a stellar view, and serves casual yet quality eats like pizza and surf 'n' turf barbeque. A good spot for a nightcap after taking advatnage of the districts many boutiques and shopping malls.

    Mamoz: Also located in Causeway Bay, Mamoz (pictured) is on the 27th and 28th floors of Cubus, which is filled with plenty of other high-end bars and restaurants. Hold off the sense of vertigo while standing on its glass floor or soaking up the view through the full-length windows on the first floor, or head up to its rooftop terrace. The bar serves up fancy bar tapas and understated yet exquisite cocktails like favorites the Clover Leaf and the Fancy Cider, or even the Tear Rock (which is served in an ice sculpture) if you're feeling adventurous. Live DJs on weekends.

    Ozone: Ozone is about as high as you can go--located at the top of the tallest hotel in the world (on the 118th floor, to be specific), this bar is nothing to sniff at. Enjoy views of the harbour from the balcony over Asian-inspired snacks and a cocktail.

    Wooloomooloo Prime: Part of the Wooloomooloo collective of Australian-style steakhouses, with branches across the city including in Central and Wan Chai, Wooloomooloo Prime is on the 21st floor of Tsim Sha Tsui mall The One. Its terrace provides sweeping views of Victoria Harbour, Hong Kong Island and Tsim Sha Tsui which you can enjoy over a steak or some seafood along with a classic cocktail.
  • On February 28, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What are the best restaurants in Hong Kong?

    Courtesy of Cafe Deco Group With over 15,000 dining establishments in the city, you'll have more than enough to pick from no matter what you're in the mood for; the difficulty here might be picking a restaurant to begin with! To help you out, here are just a few of the best spots Hong Kong has to offer:

    Best Brunch: As its name suggests, Top Deck (pictured) is located at the top of the Jumbo Kingdom collective of floating restaurants in Aberdeen. Serving a combination of Western and Asian fare, the 9,000 square foot al fresco space is well-known for its weekend champagne brunch.

    Best American: ...Cajun food, to be specific. Magnolia is a private kitchens where all reservations need to be pre-booked; guests are ushered into a sitting room for cocktails and canapes before being seated in a homey dining room where they'll enjoy a multi-course menu of offerings from gumbo to barbequed ribs to pecan pie. BYOB, no corkage fee. Parties of ten or more can enjoy a private room.

    Best Hot Pot: Megan's Kitchen is a cut above other hot pot joints with its innovative soup bases--including the likes of tomato and crab soup with a souffle finish--and wide selection of seafood and beef; in fact, it offers different cuts of beef from all over the world. Other Cantonese dishes are on offer as well as wines and liquors from China and Japan. The space leans towards the western-inspired in terms of decor, and includes several VIP rooms.

    Best Cantonese: The only restaurant to receive three stars in the first Michelin Guide to Hong Kong, Lung King Heen is a luxurious table with a great view at the Four Seasons. Expect all the classics like dim sum and mango pudding--along with a couple of western twists--made with the very best of ingredients.
  • On February 25, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What are quirky local customs in Hong Kong?

    Hong Kong often interweaves a fast-paced, modern way of life with traditional Chinese customs, which are a mishmash of Buddhism, Taoism, folk religion and others. Spirituality varies from person to person, and can be more common among elderly members of the population. These customs have a variety of aims, including honoring one's ancestors and encouraging good luck/getting rid of bad luck. Older shops and residential buildings will sometimes have little niches in the wall in front of the shop or flat, where incense is burned and food offered up to the god of land, in order to gain his protection.

    Certain customs are tied to specific festivals: during the Hungry Ghost Festival, it's believed by some to be unlucky to go out during the evening, as the ghosts will follow you around and bring you bad luck. Joss paper may be burned to appease the ghosts. During Chinese New Year, there are plenty of lion dances that drive away bad spirits; many housing estates and office buildings organize a lion dance through the whole building. Residents hang up a head of lettuce in offering to the lion--usually comprised of two dancers, one playing the lion's front and one the back--which the lion "eats."

    The city's colonial past influences some of its present-day customs, as well: some working class Hong Kongers have an afternoon tea of an egg tart or other pastry and milk tea at around 3pm every day, an adaptation of the British-style afternoon tea.
  • On February 25, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What are quirky local customs in Hong Kong?

    Hong Kong often interweaves a fast-paced, modern way of life with traditional Chinese customs, which are a mishmash of Buddhism, Taoism, folk religion and others. Spirituality varies from person to person, and can be more common among elderly members of the population. These customs have a variety of aims, including honoring one's ancestors and encouraging good luck/getting rid of bad luck. Older shops and residential buildings will sometimes have little niches in the wall in front of the shop or flat, where incense is burned and food offered up. Joss paper will sometimes be burned on sidewalks and other public spots in metal bins as offerings, as well.

    Certain customs are tied to specific festivals: during the Hungry Ghost Festival, it's believed by some to be unlucky to go out during the evening, as the ghosts will follow you around and bring you bad luck. During Chinese New Year, there are plenty of lion dances that drive away bad spirits; many housing estates and office buildings organize a lion dance through the whole building. Residents hang up a head of lettuce in offering to the lion--usually comprised of two dancers, one playing the lion's front and one the back--which the lion "eats."

    The city's colonial past influences some of its present-day customs, as well: some working class Hong Kongers have an afternoon tea of an egg tart or other pastry and milk tea at around 3pm every day, an adaptation of the British-style afternoon tea.
  • On February 24, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What are the best activities to do in Hong Kong?

    There's an obvious trifecta of things to do in Hong Kong: shop, eat, drink. And while the most obvious of the city's activities definitely deserve your attention, you should also make sure not to sidestep some of the other, lesser known entertainments available.

    Eat: There's something for everyone, here, both in terms of cuisines and price points. You're just as likely to find great food in a hidden hole-in-the-wall as you are in a swanky fine-dine. There are plenty of Asian and Chinese cuisines to pick from, as well as plenty of Western options. You'll even find rarer offerings including Nepalese, Turkish and Peruvian if you look hard enough.

    Shop: Such a common local activity that "roaming around windowshopping" has its own specific Cantonese slang (hang gaai), you'll be hard pressed to find a spot in the city that doesn't offer some sort of shopping mall or shopping street. Do some luxury shopping in Tsim Sha Tsui or Central; head to one of the many themed markets and shopping streets in Mong Kok, where you'll find everything from flowers to goldfish to trinkets; or peruse the many trendy local- and international-brand boutiques in Soho and Causeway Bay.

    Drink: Considering the the fast-paced lifestyle of most Hongkongers, the city is obviously one of the many "cities that never sleep" around the world. There are events going on almost every night; hit up one of the nightlife hubs around the city and catch a DJ set, watch some live jazz or simply enjoy a quality cocktail.

    Hike: While it may not seem like it at first glance, Hong Kong is actually a decent place for hiking, with plenty of trails and mostly hiking-friendly weather year round (except for the typhoon season). Between the MTR (Mass Transit Railway) and buses, most hikes are fairly easy to get to from the center of the city. Dragon's Back and the MacLehose trail are both popular choices.

    Soak up some culture: While Hong Kong has gained a reputation among some as a "cultural desert", within the last five years or so the local arts scene has grown exponentially, with big names like White Cube opening galleries here recently and plenty of solid classical music acts visiting the city. Check out the galleries along Hollywood Road, or book tickets for a dance or music performance.
  • On February 18, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What is nightlife like in Hong Kong?

    The nightlife in Hong Kong is thriving, though mostly concentrated in a handful of districts. Many areas will have a local hangout, at least, where you can relax with a pint or a game of dice. For those looking for more involved club- or bar-hopping, however, you might want to visit one of the following:

    Lan Kwai Fong & Soho: Located in Central and considered by many to be the place for partying, Lan Kwai Fong is saturated with bars and clubs, with a few restaurants and boutiques slotted in between them. One of the busiest spots during Christmas, New Year's, Halloween and practically any other holiday that provides a good excuse to get out and get drinking, LKF is home to both swankier establishments as well as casual bars where patrons spill onto the sidewalk.

    Soho (short for South of Hollywood Road), on the other hand, is a little calmer and more intimate--though the crowds have been slowly sprawling over from LKF over the years. Rather than being right next to the Central MTR station like LKF, Soho is a ten minute walk upslope via a series of convenient escalators, and nightlife spots here are smaller, trendier and more relaxed.

    Wan Chai: Known as the slightly less sophisticated place to grab a drink (to put it nicely), Lockhart and Hennessy Roads are lined with bars and pubs serving fish bowls and doing ladies' nights; the perfect place to go if you feel like dancing on the bar or spending a raucous St. Patty's Day. Head west--close to the mid-point between Wan Chai and Admiralty--if you're looking for quieter, trendier spots of the likes of newly opened tiny tapas bar 22 Ships.

    Knutsford Terrace & Tsim Sha Tsui East: Nicknamed "the Dark Side" by Hong Kong Island die-hards--despite being a quick train or ferry ride away--Tsim Sha Tsui, arguably the "Central" of Kowloon peninsula, is home to two nightlife hubs: Tsim Sha Tsui East's promenade along the harbor is lined with casual pubs playing live music--classic rock and top 40 hits galore--while Knutsford Terrace is a collection of wine bars, restaurants and hookah bars housed behind a European-facade-fronted entrance.
  • On February 17, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What are the best bars in Hong Kong?

    Courtesy of Quinary Hong Kong has a number of nightlife hubs, with bars closing and new ones opening in their place in the blink of an eye. To make it easier for you to pick where to go for a boozy night out or even for a relaxed nightcap, here are the best bars by category, from best wine bar to best bar-with-a-view.

    Best pub: If it's beer you're after, there's no contest: The Globe's beer list is almost novella-length and organized by type, with offerings from Belgium to Lebanon on tap and by the bottle. There are also guest brews that rotate weekly, and cocktails and wine for those who aren't a fan of beer. With the purported longest happy hour in the city (from 10am to 8pm), stop by this watering hole for a for a pint and some British pub grub in a relaxed yet buzzing atmosphere.

    Best view: Claiming the title of "highest bar in the world", Ozone is perched on the 118th floor of the swanky Ritz-Carlton in West Kowloon. Though a little more out of the way compared to other bars, the sweeping view of the harbor and Hong Kong Island is more than worth it. Stand on the balcony while sipping a Blueberry Mojito, or try to grab a coveted spot during one of the annual fireworks displays, if you're ambitious.

    Best wine bar: While California Vintage only stocks varieties originating from the Golden State, you'll find an eclectic mix of offerings here, as well as a knowledgeable staff on hand to help you choose your wines. There are iPads you can use to easily browse their stock by type, region, price and more, and seasonal food pairings are available, too. There are two branches, one on Wyndham Street near Lan Kwai Fong in Central, and a new branch in Wan Chai that opened late last year.

    Best mixology bar: At some establishments, the word "mixology" is nothing but a buzzword that means drinks with a swish of foam on top, but that isn't the case at Quinary, where  Antonio Lai mixes up molecular drinks utilizing scientific know-how and Asian-inspired ingredients. Highlights include the Earl Grey Caviar Martini and the Oolong Tea Collins (pictured). Settle down in one of the bar's decadent leather armchairs and enjoy the sophisticated decor while sipping on one of Lai's creations.
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