Marianne Wong

Concierge, Mandarin Oriental, San Francisco

  • San Francisco, California, USA

Marianne Wong has worked in the hospitality industry for decades and has been a concierge at Mandarin Oriental, San Francisco, since 2000. Marianne previously spent 10 years as a concierge at the Sheraton Palace Hotel in San Francisco and, before that, worked at the front desk and in the food and beverage department at the Westin St. Francis. A member of Les Clefs d’Or USA and recent vice president of the Northern California Concierge Association, Marianne holds a degree from the City College of San Francisco’s hotel and restaurant program.

  • On July 2, 2014
    Kaley Johannesson is now following Marianne Wong
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    Alain Ethier is now following Marianne Wong
  • On August 21, 2013
    Michael Smith is now following Marianne Wong
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  • On April 26, 2013
    Marianne Wong answered the question: Marianne Wong

    What is public transportation like in San Francisco?

    San Francisco has great public transportation and navigating it can be challenging for visitors that aren't use to traveling around in this fashion.  There are five different modes of public transport; two underground subways, cable cars, electric and diesel busses, trollies and ferries.   San Francisco is small enough that taxis which are relatively cheap and less time consuming easy option to take one way or both ways to major sights.  The easiest solution is to dial 311 to get a live person to help figure out which bus or transit to take you to where you want to go.
  • On April 26, 2013
    Marianne Wong answered the question: Marianne Wong

    What are the best neighborhoods in San Francisco?

    I like a neighborhood that tells a story about its former inhabitants and the history and culture they left behind that lives on and continues to thrive.  One of the most vibrant neighborhoods in San Francisco, the Mission and Castro Districts merge, mingle and melds together like a good Almadovar movie.  To know a neighborhood, you have to walk it, so start at 14th Street and Valencia, get cranked up with a cup of local joe at any of the good coffee houses on this street.  Walk up Valencia to Clarion Alley, see the fantastical murals painted on the walls of the houses that backs up into this alley.  The mural art form is a strong one in San Francisco, where you'll find it popping up in unexpected places adding color and character to neighborhood streets.  Continue on Valencia to 18th Street and turn right to Dolores Park, named after Mission Dolores.  The city's namesake, Mision San Francisco de Asisi, founded by the Spanish in 1776 is the oldest building in San Francisco.  Continue on 18th Street to Castro Street, turn left or right to enjoy this colorful community of Gay life.  This walk and the neighborhood speaks of the immigrants and outcasts from society, and how they made a home here, an oasis to live, love and build a future.  Their struggles and successes has enriched the culture to this city.
  • On April 26, 2013
    Marianne Wong answered the question: Marianne Wong

    What are the best neighborhoods in San Francisco?

    I like a neighborhood that tells a story about its former inhabitants and the history and culture they left behind that lives on and continues to thrive.  One of the most vibrant neighborhoods in San Francisco, the Mission and Castro Districts merge, mingle and melds together like a good Almadovar movie.  To know a neighborhood, you have to walk it, so start at 14th Street and Valencia and get cranked up with a cup of local joe at any of the good coffee houses on this street.  Walk up Valencia to Clarion Alley and see the fantastical murals painted on the walls of the houses that backs up into this alley.  The mural artform is a strong one in San Francisco, where you'll find it popping up in unexpected places adding color and character to neighborhood streets.  Continue on Valencia to 18th Street and turn right to Dolores Park, named after Mission Dolores.  Mision San Francisco de Asisi, was founded by the Spanish in 1776 and is the oldest building in San Francisco, and what this city is named after.  Continue on 18th Street to Castro and turn left or right to enjoy this colorful community of Gay life.  This walk and the neighborhood speaks of the immigrants from other countries and outcasts from society, and how they made a home here, an oasis to live, love and build a future.  Their struggles and successes has given character and enriched the culture to this city.
  • On April 26, 2013
    Marianne Wong answered the question: Marianne Wong

    What are the best neighborhoods in San Francisco?

    I like a neighborhood that tells a story about its former inhabitants and the history and culture they left behind that lives on and continues to thrive.  One of the most vibrant neighborhoods in San Francisco, the Mission and Castro Districts merge, mingle and melds together like a good Almadovar movies.  To know a neighborhood, you have to walk it, so start at 14th Street and Valencia and get cranked up with a cup of local joe at any of the good coffee houses on this street.  Walk up Valencia to Clarion Alley and see the fantastical murals painted on the walls of the houses that backs up into this alley.  The mural artform is a strong one in San Francisco, where you'll find it popping up in unexpected places adding color and character to neighborhood streets.  Continue on Valencia to 18th Street and turn right to Dolores Park, named after Mission Dolores.  Mision San Francisco de Asisi, was founded by the Spanish in 1776 and is the oldest building in San Francisco, and what this city is named after.  Continue on 18th Street to Castro and turn left or right to enjoy this colorful community of Gay life.  This walk and the neighborhood speaks of the immigrants from other countries and outcasts from society, and how they made a home here, an oasis to live, love and build a future.  Their struggles and successes has given character and enriched the culture to this city.
  • On April 26, 2013
    Marianne Wong answered the question: Marianne Wong

    What are the best neighborhoods in San Francisco?

    I like a neighborhood that tells a story about its former inhabitants and the history and culture they left behind that lives on and continues to thrive.  One of the most vibrant neighborhoods in San Francisco, the Mission and Castro Districts merges, mingles and melds together like a good Almadovar movies.  To know a neighborhood, you have to walk it, so start at 14th Street and Valencia and get cranked up with a cup of local joe at any of the good coffee houses on this street.  Walk up Valencia to Clarion Alley and see the fantastical murals painted on the walls of the houses that backs up into this alley.  The mural artform is a strong one in San Francisco, where you'll find it popping up in unexpected places adding color and character to neighborhood streets.  Continue on Valencia to 18th Street and turn right to Dolores Park, named after Mission Dolores.  Mision San Francisco de Asisi, was founded by the Spanish in 1776 and is the oldest building in San Francisco, and what this city is named after.  Continue on 18th Street to Castro and turn left or right to enjoy this colorful community of Gay life.  This walk and the neighborhood speaks of the immigrants from other countries and outcasts from society, and how they made a home here, an oasis to live, love and build a future.  Their struggles and successes has given character and enriched the culture to this city.
  • On April 26, 2013
    Marianne Wong answered the question: Marianne Wong

    What are quirky local customs in San Francisco?

    Native San Franciscans asks for tap water at restaurants for two reasons.  One, the tap water in San Francisco is sourced from the Hetchy Hetchy Resevoir from Yosemite Valley, an extremely prestine area of the National Park, the only resevoir situated in a National Park.  Second, bottle water causes landfill.

    Years ago the leaders of San Francisco set out a mandate to recycle sixty percent of its waste, and to date, this has been achieved.  This was accomplished by banning styrofoam, plastic bags and container, along with an intensive educational outreach.  You will see three refuse containers; green for compost, blue for non-food related recyclables and black for landfill.  Recently, the limited use of paper bags has begun.  Shop owners charge ten cents to customers who request a paper bag, to discourage the use of a bag and to remind the public to bring their own tote bags.  The trend is to carry lightweight colapsable totes, many stores carrying these for sale and many companies advertise on giveaway totes to encourage environmental consciousness.  Take out containers and utensils are made of compostable corn based by-product.

    While San Francisco is a dynamic world class city, the restaurants tend to close early, generally by 10pm.  So plan your days and nights accordingly.  Most restaurants are filled up by 7pm so if you wish to dine at an exclusive restaurant, you're likely to snag a table later in the evening.   

    Because San Francisco has experienced two major earthquakes, the Emergency Management Team tests a city-wide alarm at 12 noon every Tuesday.  For visitors, this alarm emits from the Ferry Building at the foot of Market Street at the Bay.  
  • On April 26, 2013
    Marianne Wong answered the question: Marianne Wong

    What are the best chocolate shops in San Francisco?

    With the food obsessed populous of this town, is it any surprise that San Francisco has many tempting options for delicious local chocolates?  From Ghiradelli to local artisans, such as Recchiuti's at the Ferry Building and XOX Truffles in North Beach, chocolate is well respresented here.  There are many fine choices but I want to celebrate a favorite amongst locals, See's Candies.  This confectionary has served Californians since 1921 and continues to be the choice for many in the Bay Area.  From Valentine's Day to the Holidays, See's Candies is a long standing tradition. For those raised here, Christmas and Hanukkah (yes, it's kosher) means a pound box of mixed chocolates or nuts and chews sitting on the coffee table to nibble throughout the holiday season.  The free standing stores are simply a delight, visit this venerable Grande Dame of chocolate confectionaries that is truly a San Francisco treat.  
  • On April 6, 2013
    Marianne Wong answered the question: Marianne Wong

    What are the best free museums in San Francisco?

    The best kept secret in San Francisco is the amazing private museum Pier 24 Photography.  Pier 24 Photograhy is comprised of the private colleciton of the Pilara Foundation, with a space created to enchance the viewing and appreciation of photographic works by masters such as Dorothea Lange, Diane Arbus, William Eggelston, Robert Frank and many more.  Book online or call for a free appointment.  By reservations only, this affords a quiet, contemplative environment to enjoy the exhibits.  www.pier24.org.
  • On April 6, 2013
    Marianne Wong answered the question: Marianne Wong

    What are the best chocolate shops in San Francisco?

    With the food obsessed populous of this town, is it any surprise that San Francisco has many tempting options for delicious local chocolates?  From Ghiradelli to local artisans, such as Recchiuti's at the Ferry Building and XOX Truffles in North Beach, chocolate is well respresented here.  There are many fine choices but I want to celebrate the favorite of many locals, See's Candies.  This confectionary has served Californians since 1921 and continues to be the choice for many in the Bay Area.  From Valentine's Day to the Holidays, See's Candies is a long standing tradition. For those raised here, Christmas and Hanukkah (yes, it's kosher) means a pound box of mixed chocolates or nuts and chews sitting on the coffee table to nibble throughout the holiday season.  Visit the delightful free standing stores to get a true feel of this venerable Grand Dame of chocolate confectionaries in San Francisco.