Stephanie Nitsch

Correspondent

  • Park City, Utah, USA

Stephanie Nitsch is a correspondent who covers the Park City area for Forbes Travel Guide. She moved to Utah in 2006 to fuel her lust for alpine adventures and a small-town mountain lifestyle. Since picking up her pen as a freelance writer some years ago, Nitsch has biked the desert single track in Baja, snowboarded the weathered peaks of the Andes and road-tripped across the blue highways of the United States. Her work has appeared in Park City Magazine, Bike, Dirt Rag, Snowboard Canada and ESPN.com, among other publications.

  • On February 27, 2013

    You don't have to be a kid to enjoy family-friendly hotel amenities like bowling, miniature golf or tubing. (But it sure does help!) Check out these Park City, Utah hotels that cater to the child in all of us. http://www.forbestravelguide.com/park-city-utah/what-are-the-best-family-hotels-in-park-city?preferredAttributionId=stephanie-nitsch

  • On February 27, 2013
    Stephanie Nitsch answered the question: Stephanie Nitsch

    What are the best bars in Park City?

    Courtesy of No Name Saloon The spirit of the West is calling, and High West Distillery and Saloon is the answer. This gastro-saloon at the base of Town Lift is the only ski-in/stumble-out distillery in the world and pays homage to the history of saloons in the Old West. Upon entering the distillery, you’ll be greeted by a 250-gallon copper still, used to produce award-winning, small-batch whiskies and vodkas. As Utah’s only whiskey distillery, High West’s bar and restaurant have quickly become a Park City staple, especially with its menu of culinary concoctions and small plate vittles. In the winter, an outdoor ice bar serves up a limited menu of High West’s most popular cocktails, including a fragrant whiskey cider, around an open fire pit.

    No Name Saloon on Main Street is the quintessential ski town watering hole in Park City, but don’t let its drive bar personality keep you from walking through the doors. On any night of the week, No Name is bustling with thirsty patrons in the mood for loud music and large schooners of beer. Mardi Gras beads dangle from moose antlers, which may or may not distract you during a round of shuffleboard, and though its typical bar menu keeps the appetite at bay between rounds of drinks, No Name’s Buffalo Burger is notoriously popular among locals and visitors. The two-story bar also features a rooftop patio – a perfect addition to summertime imbibing

    Park City boasts plenty of après ski bars, but none can compare to the ambient mood of Sky Blue, located inside the chic Sky Lodge hotel. Head to this rooftop lounge for upscale cocktails and wide-angle views of Park City’s Historic District and Park City Mountain Resort. Large bay windows open up to an outdoor patio, which is dotted with comfy chaise lounge chairs and toasty outdoor fire pits. Sky Blue provides soft and snuggly throws or blankets if you prefer to sip your libation outside, but if you’re still cold, patrons are invited to don their beach attire and soak in the bubbling rooftop hot tub, open to guests of the Sky Blue lounge. Sky Blue also features a “menu” of premium cigars among their top shelf selection of spirits.
  • On February 27, 2013

    Where do you head after a day on the slopes? To a bar, of course. Check out the top apres ski bars in Park City, Utah to quench your thirst. http://www.forbestravelguide.com/park-city-utah/what-are-the-best-bars-in-park-city?preferredAttributionId=stephanie-nitsch

  • On February 27, 2013
    Stephanie Nitsch answered the question: Stephanie Nitsch

    What are the best family hotels in Park City?

    Visit Park City, and it's easy for adults to indulge their inner child, thanks to the endless adventures and activities that await. But for travelers with kids in tow, these family-friendly hotels offer plenty of entertainment and enjoyment for everyone.

    The Four-Star Montage Deer Valley offers its signature Paintbox program for children ages 5 through 12, where kids spend their time between crafts, games, scavenger hunts and other indoor/outdoor activities. Dine at the kid-friendly Daly’s Pub & Rec restaurant and enjoy its savory menu of comfort foods, including brick-oven pizzas and classic mac ‘n’ cheese, as well as plenty of activities like vintage arcade games, Wii and bowling for the whole family. Additionally, miles of hiking, biking and skiing trails at Deer Valley Resort will tucker out the whole family with little effort.

    Don’t be surprised when your kids beg you to head to the heated outdoor pool at the Grand Summit Hotel at Canyons Resort after a day on the hill – after all, it’s one of the first amenities you’ll spot at this slopeside lodge. Mere steps from the hotel, families will be greeted with the resort’s village area, filled with a relaxing ‘ski beach,’ numerous food carts (perfect for snack time), a convenient ski school drop-off and a miniature golf course in the summer – which doubles as a learn-to-ski area for small children in the winter.

    Surrounded by the mountain-urban setting within Redstone Center, Newpark Resort is ideal for families looking for the next adventure. Each room is equipped with private hot tubs for a post-skiing soak, and dozens of kid-friendly restaurants, shops and activities (including a bowling center and movie theater) are all within a short walk. A lift-served tubing park keeps families entertained in the winter, while the nearby Utah Olympic Park exposes kids to the thrills of adrenaline-riddled sports like bobsledding and ski jumping.
  • On February 26, 2013
    Stephanie Nitsch answered the question: Stephanie Nitsch

    What are the best hotels in Park City?

    Courtesy of The St. Regis Deer Valley Sultry and splendid, the Waldorf Astoria Park City exudes mountain elegance within each of its 174 rooms and residences. The Four-Star property has aligned itself with neighboring Canyons Resort, which touts 4,000 acres of mountain adventures, to offer a dynamic, four-season getaway. Relax at the hotel’s Golden Door Spa and surround yourself with the tranquil Living Green Wall between customized treatments, or head to SLOPES Restaurant for a modern mountain menu, which often utilizes farm-fresh ingredients from the nearby Farmer’s Market in the summer.

    Butlers and privacy await at The St. Regis Deer Valley, making the slopes feel like your own personal mountains. Visitors come here for the high-caliber service and undivided attention, which is reinforced by considerate amenities like a nightly champagne toast, après ski vittles and Four-Star spa amenities. Outdoor adventure tours are available from the on-site recreation guides, and the savory cuisine at Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s J&G Grill will quell your appetite after hiking/biking/skiing up an appetite.

    Influenced by contemporary mountain craftsman design, Montage Deer Valley feels more home than hotel. Artifacts from the Park City Museum and more than 200 original pieces of artwork are decorated throughout the Four-Star hotel, paying tribute to Park City’s historic past and scenic beauty. Outdoor adventures are mere feet away, with spectacular skiing, hiking and biking trails straight out the door. Inside, gastronomical delights at four separate restaurants and a 35,000 square foot spa welcome visitors to relax in the comfort of flawless service.

    Its Forbes Five-Star rating aside, Stein Eriksen Lodge in Deer Valley is one of the most revered hotels in Utah. This classic ski lodge borrows design aspects from Norwegian mountain culture for a stunningly classic and comfortable luxury hotel. The rustic lobby is accented with large stone fireplaces and rich wooden beams; its rooms and suites offer exquisite views and private outdoor hot tubs. The Five-Star Spa at Stein Eriksen and the Four-Star Glitretind Restaurant, known for its gourmet breakfast and weekend brunch buffets, are elegant amenities not to be missed.
  • On February 25, 2013
    Stephanie Nitsch answered the question: Stephanie Nitsch

    What are the best bars in Park City?

    Courtesy of No Name Saloon The spirit of the West is calling, and High West Distillery and Saloon is the answer. This gastro-saloon at the base of Town Lift is the only ski-in/stumble-out distillery in the world and pays homage to the history of saloons in the Old West. Upon entering the distillery, you’ll be greeted by a 250-gallon copper still, used to produce award-winning, small-batch whiskies and vodkas. As Utah’s only whiskey distillery, High West’s bar and restaurant have quickly become a Park City staple, especially with its menu of culinary concoctions and small plate vittles. In the winter, an outdoor ice bar serves up a limited menu of High West’s most popular cocktails, including a fragrant whiskey cider, around an open fire pit.

    No Name Saloon on Main Street is the quintessential ski town watering hole in Park City, but don’t let its drive bar personality keep you from walking through the doors. On any night of the week, No Name is bustling with thirsty patrons in the mood for loud music and large schooners of beer. Mardi Gras beads dangle from moose antlers, which may or may not distract you during a round of shuffleboard, and though its typical bar menu keeps the appetite at bay between rounds of drinks, No Name’s Buffalo Burger is notoriously popular among locals and visitors. The two-story bar also features a rooftop patio – a perfect addition to summertime imbibing

    Park City boasts plenty of après ski bars, but none can compare to the ambient mood of Sky Blue, located inside the chic Sky Lodge hotel. Head to this rooftop lounge for upscale cocktails and wide-angle views of Park City’s Historic District and Park City Mountain Resort. Large bay windows open up to an outdoor patio, which is dotted with comfy chaise lounge chairs and toasty outdoor fire pits. Sky Blue provides soft and snuggly throws or blankets if you prefer to sip your libation outside, but if you’re still cold, patrons are invited to don their beach attire and soak in the bubbling rooftop hot tub, open to guests of the Sky Blue lounge. Sky Blue also features a “menu” of premium cigars among their top shelf selection of spirits.
  • On February 19, 2013
    Stephanie Nitsch answered the question: Stephanie Nitsch

    What is the best shopping in Park City?

    Courtesy of Park City Chamber/Bureau Main Street is Park City’s staple for boutique shopping and window gazing. With dozens of independent and eclectic shops lining Main Street, you’ll be sure to find one-of-a-kind treasures for any occasion. Stretching eight blocks, Main Street storefronts cover the spectrum of shopping preferences and include stores that carry handmade accessories (try Root’d or Atticus Teahouse), trendy threads (browse clothing boutiques like Flight, Cake or Prospect Youth for kids) and whimsical art (Silver Queen and Terzian Galleries give a nod to colorful artwork). Plus, Western wear, jewelry shops and bookstores are just as plentiful for more sentimental purchases.
     
    Kimball Junction boasts a large shopping area with stores that range from locally owned boutiques to national chains. Its urban layout is pedestrian-friendly, and an outlet mall nearby is perfect for forgotten items and or stocking up on warmer layers.
     
    Additionally, all three of Park City’s ski resorts carry fashionable apparel and gear for the latest in skiing and snowboarding trends and technologies.
  • On February 19, 2013
    Stephanie Nitsch answered the question: Stephanie Nitsch

    What are the best restaurants in Park City?

    Courtesy of Silver Restaurant Roughly 100 bars and restaurants satisfy the eclectic tastes of hungry visitors throughout Park City, but this Utah ski town has more to offer than typical mountain fare. Some of Park City's best restaurants include:

    1. Glitretind
    This quintessential ski town restaurant serves up Four-Star cuisine inside the Five-Star-rated Stein Eriksen Lodge in Park City. Surrounded by views of Deer Valley Resort’s slopes, diners will find themselves melting into the restaurant’s oversized leather chairs or cozying up among the rustic and romantic décor. Chef Zane Holmquist pairs the winter weather with a hearty menu of tender Duck & Waffles or Rocky Mountain Elk Tenderloin, glazed with a wild mushroom-huckleberry ragout. In the summer, the menu features lighter fare to compliment the warmer weather, like buttery Seared Sea Scallops or surf ‘n’ turf-style Buffalo Flank Steak & Brown Gulf Shrimp. The Skiers’ Buffet breakfast, served every morning, is an opulent spread of cooked-to-perfection eggs, maple-cured bacon, homemade pastries and plump berries that will fuel your outdoor adventures all day long.


    2. Shabu
    The sultry ambiance of Shabu feels so right in a cozy mountain town. Named after the Asian version of broth-based fondue dish (known as shabu shabu), Shabu has put a freestyle spin on traditional Asian cuisine. Walk into this moody, lower-level lounge for a signature “sake-tini” or a handmade maki roll and imbibe in culinary creativity throughout the night. Whether you’re in the mood for sushi or entrees, the cuisine features an extensive menu of sweet and savory delectables, like miso glazed black cod or curried lemongrass crusted swordfish, which also accommodate gluten-free lifestyles.
     
    3. Riverhorse on Main
    A list of significant awards might not dictate your dinner plans, but Riverhorse on Main is a must-visit restaurant for the culinary aficionado. And rightfully so: this Four-Star restaurant has been a top choice for eclectic American cuisine for lunch and dinner. During lunch, patrons can expect the comforts of their favorite classics, like the Ultimate Grilled Cheese Sandwich, featuring three types of cheese and an unexpected addition of bacon, or Crispy Southern Fried Chicken with homemade andouille sausage gravy. Dinner becomes more intimate and romantic when the sun sets. Sample the flavors of Riverhorse with the Chef’s Individual Tasting Trio or the Trio of Wild Game – or discover lighter entrees like Macadamia Nut Crusted Alaskan Halibut or Pan-Seared Mississippi Quail. Even vegetarians are given a seemingly endless choice of Riverhorse classics.
     
    4. Silver
    Located on Main Street, Silver pays tribute to the dazzling ore that was once abundant in Park City with a posh, modern spin. The three-story restaurant offers intimate gathering space in the lower level lounge, an open kitchen design in the main dining room and lively ambiance in the mezzanine bar. Its menu is inspired by the current harvest season, featuring progressive American cuisine such as Rabbit & Black Garlic Pappardelle and Mary’s Organic Duck Breast. Handcrafted cocktails get special treatment, especially with the Bartender’s Roulette – a mystery concoction created at the hands of a master mixologist.
  • On February 19, 2013
    Stephanie Nitsch answered the question: Stephanie Nitsch

    What are the best attractions in Park City?

    Courtesy of Park City Chamber/Bureau. Photographer, John McCarthy. Park City has a penchant for attracting the world’s best winter sport athletes, thanks to a number of official training venues and facilities. (Park City co-hosted the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City.) In addition to the area's three ski resorts - Park City Mountain, Deer Valley and Canyons - the Utah Olympic Park pays tribute to past and present winter athletes with its ski history museum and 2002 Olympic museum. Here visitors can discover more about these sports by watching one of many seasonal competitions in person or becoming an athlete themselves, either through the Utah Olympic Park’s Comet bobsled ride or navigating a skeleton sled down the icy track on their own.
     
    Park City’s Historic District is an essential stop in any season. Located in the valleys of Park City’s small foothills, this district gave birth to the once thriving silver mining town in the late 19th century. Walk along Main Street and wander the residential streets of Old Town for an architectural digest of old-meets-new. More than 80 buildings and houses have been preserved and are currently listed on the National Register of Historic Places, although many have been updated for 21st century aesthetics. Include a stop at the Park City Museum for an intriguing look into Park City’s mining past and skiing legacy, or explore the town by means of a guided ghost tour.
     
    Swaner EcoCenter has adopted more than 1200 acres of wetlands and protected the area from any development. The result is an ecological haven for nearly 100 wild critters that are native to the area, such as elk, moose, minks, red foxes, eagles, sandhill cranes and beavers. The Swaner Preserve welcomes the public, including hikers, bikers, snowshoers, birdwatchers and photographers, to stroll its recreational trail system or tour the hands-on nature exhibits inside the Platinum LEED facility.
  • On February 18, 2013
    Stephanie Nitsch answered the question: Stephanie Nitsch

    Should visitors rent a car in Park City?

    Courtesy of Park City Four Wheel Drive A rental car isn’t essential in Park City and, in fact, can sometimes be more stressful when trying to navigate the town on your own. Located a short 35-mile drive from the Salt Lake City International Airport, visitors can get to their Park City hotel by means of a private or shared shuttle ride. Once in town, the free, citywide public transportation stops at nearly every imaginable destination, and many hotels or lodges offer their own complimentary in-town shuttle service for guests.

    Driving conditions can become treacherous depending on the severity of a winter storm, but if you do plan on driving a car during a winter visit, it’s recommended to rent a vehicle equipped with four-wheel drive – especially if you plan to trek outside of Park City and ski or snowboard at any of the eight other mountains within a two-hour drive. Bonus if you rent a car that’s already equipped with a ski or snowboard rack in the winter or a bike rack in the summer, like the vehicles avalable through Park City Four Wheel Drive.
  • On February 17, 2013
    Stephanie Nitsch answered the question: Stephanie Nitsch

    What are the best restaurants in Salt Lake City?

    Courtesy of Pallet/Eric Russell Photography 1. Pallet
    As a relatively new restaurant, Pallet has brought an ambient buzz that compliments Salt Lake City’s downtown revitalization. The restaurant’s heritage (as an early 20th century loading dock) is woven throughout the modern industrial décor, illuminating the setting for the real star: its food. Like many restaurants, the menu at Pallet is inspired by global victuals and travels, but Executive Chef Zachary Willey pulls from the local food purveyor scene and juxtaposes simple yet multi-layered flavors, like its Sweet Gnocchi Pillows or Apples & Bacon, that entice the taste buds.
     
    2. The Copper Onion
    Small plate dining meets contemporary comfort food at The Copper Onion for a crowd-pleasing favorite in Salt Lake City. Modest entrée portions might not satisfy the pangs of a hungry diner, but the savory bites are sized just right for sampling your way through a shareable feast. Artisan vittles like marbled Creminelli salamis and creamy Snowy Mountain feta are made locally and perk up a charcuterie platter. Casual fare (think golden steak fries or tender Brussels sprouts) are cleverly designed as posh side dishes that are best accompanied by one of Copper Onion’s meaty entrees.
     
    3. Takashi
    When you’re 800+ miles from the nearest ocean, it’s hard to believe that a landlocked state can tempt you with coastal-fresh sushi. But Takashi’s popular vote speaks highly of its reputation that rivals sushi hubs like Seattle or San Fran (so plan accordingly on weekends). Sip on premium sakes, Japanese ales and artful cocktails while your chopsticks cut into delicate sashimi slices of buttery, ocean-to-table fish. Creative rolls and fusion tapas are garnished with aesthetic touches from the hands of its mastermind sushi chefs, including owner Takashi Gobi. Takashi’s ambiance is as vibrant as the food, so you might just find yourself lingering here a little longer over dinner than you planned.
  • On February 12, 2013
    Kim Atkinson is now following Stephanie Nitsch
  • On January 31, 2013
    Stephanie Nitsch answered the question: Stephanie Nitsch

    Where can you get the best view in Salt Lake City?

    Steve Greenwood/Visit Salt Lake The best vantage point of Salt Lake City could arguably be along the Bonneville Shoreline Trail in the foothills, which encompasses views of the sprawling city straight ahead, the Wasatch Mountains to the east and the Oquirrh Mountains to the west.

    But Salt Lake’s rolling terrain isn’t just an ideal locale to take in the view: it’s also the ideal view. At five stories tall, Salt Lake City’s main public library branch may not be the tallest building in town, but its rooftop garden provides a scenic foreground to absorb the panoramic mountains that trace along the background. From here, you’ll be able to spot the celestial Mount Olympus looming over the southeast corner of the Salt Lake Valley.

    Of course, if you’re flying into Salt Lake, be sure to catch an aerial view of the scene below you. With two mountain ranges flanking Salt Lake City to the east and west, and the Great Salt Lake to the north, a window seat on the airplane provides visitors with a remarkable geological perspective.
  • On January 31, 2013
    Stephanie Nitsch answered the question: Stephanie Nitsch

    Should visitors rent a car in Salt Lake City?

    Mark Fisher/Visit Salt Lake With the debut of the new TRAX light rail line from the Salt Lake City International Airport to the downtown area in April 2013, renting a car in Salt Lake is more akin to a luxury than a necessity. Once open, the new TRAX airport line will be a quick shuttle that drops off passengers in a “free fare” bus zone downtown that services venues as far south as the Grand America Hotel and as far north as The Gateway shopping center.

    Visitors who purchase the Ski Salt Lake Super Pass, a discounted lift ticket that can be redeemed at Alta, Brighton, Snowbird or Solitude ski resorts, are privy to free round-trip transportation on the Utah Transit Authority (UTA) ski buses and TRAX light rail – a convenient option if you plan on heading to the mountains and wish to leave the winter driving up to someone else. Alternatively, a number of private and shared shuttle options from Salt Lake to Park City, Big Cottonwood Canyon or Little Cottonwood Canyon.

    If you choose to rent a car, a vehicle with 4-wheel drive or all-wheel drive is helpful in the winter, when the mountain passes and, occasionally, Salt Lake City are prone to slick, snowy roads.
  • On January 30, 2013
    Stephanie Nitsch answered the question: Stephanie Nitsch

    Should visitors rent a car in Salt Lake City?

    Mark Fisher/Visit Salt Lake With the debut of the new TRAX light rail line from the Salt Lake City International Airport to the downtown area in April 2013, renting a car in Salt Lake is more akin to a luxury than a necessity. Once open, the new TRAX airport line will be a quick shuttle that drops off passengers in a “free fare” bus zone downtown that services venues as far south as the Grand America Hotel and as far north as The Gateway shopping center.

    Visitors who purchase the Ski Salt Lake Super Pass, a discounted lift ticket that can be redeemed at Alta, Brighton, Snowbird or Solitude ski resorts, are privy to free round-trip transportation on the Utah Transit Authority (UTA) ski buses and TRAX light rail – a convenient option if you plan on heading to the mountains and wish to leave the winter driving up to someone else. Alternatively, a number of private and shared shuttle options from Salt Lake to Park City, Big Cottonwood Canyon or Little Cottonwood Canyon.