What are the best bakeries in Rome?

Answers from Our Experts (3)

Erica Firpo

Just as every neighborhood has a market, every neighborhood also has a bakery or two. Citing one as "the best" can be fighting words, so let's play safe and list the top bakeries by neighborhood.

In the center, everyone will tell you to head to Campo de' Fiori for the pizza bianca at the Forno right on the square at #22. The forno makes pizza and bread (like local favorites Genzano, Lariano and Osso) daily, and across the alley at vicolo del Gallo 14, the Forno also makes sandwiches, cookies and other pastries.  The nearby Antico Forno Roscioli, on via dei Chiavari 34, has a killer pizza rossa, among other kinds of pizza, great selection of breads and pastries, and a delicious tavola calda (a kind of take out diner).

Nobody visits Trastevere without a bite of pizza from La Renellaa busy bakery on via del Moro 15.  Monti's Antico Forno ai Serpenti on Via dei Serpenti,122-123, a neighborhood staple, was renovated last year and has a great selection of baked goods as well as jams, confits and marmalades.  Up the hill in the Santa Maria Maggiore area, Panella on via Merula 54 has a mouth-watering selection of baked goods, in particular Roman specialities and is excellent lunch spot.

The sprawling Trionfale area behind the Vatican boasts Rome's latest VIP bakery and take out pizza shop.  Gabriele Bonci has recently become internationally famous thanks to his amazing and creative pizzas at Pizzarium on Via della Meloria, 43, and now is staking his dough at his epynomous bakery Panificio Bonci, via Trionfale 34/36.

For those with a sweet tooth, some of my favorite pastry shops are Campo de' Fiori's Pasticerria De Bellis Piazza del Paradiso 56, the Ghetto's DolceRomaVia del Portico D'Ottavia, 20/B, and Mondo di Laura, Via della Reginella, 18, and finally Trastevere's Biscottificio Innocenti Via della Luce 21.

Erica Firpo

Just as every neighborhood has a market, every neighborhood also has a bakery or two. Citing one as "the best" can be fighting words, so let's play safe and list the top bakeries by neighborhood.

In the center, everyone will tell you to head to Campo de' Fiori for the pizza bianca at the Forno right on the square at #22. The forno makes pizza and bread (like local favorites Genzano, Lariano and Osso) daily, and across the alley at vicolo del Gallo 14, the Forno also makes sandwiches, cookies and other pastries.  The nearby Antico Forno Roscioli, on via dei Chiavari 34, has a killer pizza rossa, among other kinds of pizza, great selection of breads and pastries, and a delicious tavola calda (a kind of take out diner).

Nobody visits Trastevere without a bite of pizza from La Renella, a busy bakery on via del Moro 15.  Monti's Antico Forno ai Serpenti on Via dei Serpenti,122-123, a neighborhood staple, was renovated last year and has a great selection of baked goods as well as jams, confits and marmalades.  Up the hill in the Santa Maria Maggiore area, Panella on via Merula 54 has a mouth-watering selection of baked goods, in particular Roman specialities and is excellent lunch spot.

The sprawling Trionfale area behind the Vatican boasts Rome's latest VIP bakery and take out pizza shop.  Gabriele Bonci has recently become internationally famous thanks to his amazing and creative pizzas at Pizzarium on Via della Meloria, 43, and now is staking his dough at his epynomous bakery Panificio Bonci, via Trionfale 34/36.

For those with a sweet tooth, some of my favorite pastry shops are Campo de' Fiori's Pasticerria De Bellis Piazza del Paradiso 56, the Ghetto's DolceRoma, Via del Portico D'Ottavia, 20/B, and Il Mondo di Laura, Via della Reginella, 18, and finally Trastevere's Biscottificio Innocenti Via della Luce 21.

Angela Corrias
Photo by Angela Corrias

Luckily for bread-lovers like me, Rome is full of excellent bakeries. In every neighborhood the tempting scent of freshly baked bread floats on the air teasing both Italian and foreign palates.

Whatever diet they're on or whatever the occasion is, Italians will never be able to do without bread on their table. Brown, crunchy, spongy, as bread is the very first staple in the Bel Paese, the many bakeries have been evolving and inventing new types of the beloved good.

One of the oldest and most popular bakeries in Rome is Antico Forno Roscioli, 34 Via dei Chiavari, near Campo de' Fiori. You'll hardly resist their mouthwatering display window, and once inside you'll have a huge choice of bread made following Roman traditional recipes, and plenty of cakes, pastries and all types of sweets, from warm apple pies to pistachio pies to delicious cakes made with ricotta and chocolate.

Still near Campo de' Fiori is another famous bakery, Forno Campo de' Fiori (Campo de' Fiori 22) open since 1970 and whose promise is to use only highly selected ingredients to ensure the best quality.

One of my very favorite is Panella, 54 Via Merulana, near Piazza Vittorio, delicious bakery living up to its promises for almost 100 years. Delicious its walnut bread, bread with five cereals, black olive bread and specialties such as arugula bread and pumpkin bread. Hard to resist also their sweet products, from the mini sacher cakes, to the jam tarts to the cream dumplings.

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