What are the best sushi restaurants in San Francisco?

Answers from Our Experts (2)

Katie Sweeney

For sushi, I head to one of three places. The first is Tataki in Pacific Heights. Tataki is a small, intimate, quiet, and upscale sushi bar. The menu is 100 percent sustainable — this means that all of the seafood is responsibly sourced and environmentally friendly. Their specialty rolls are exceptional, especially the signature tataki with 5 varieties of seared fish, cucumber, avocado, and tobiko. Tatki also has two other locations in San Francisco: one in Noe Valley and another in Glen Park.

Sometimes you're with a large group and you want to have a little fun while eating sushi. When that is the case, head to Tsunami Sushi on Divisadero. It's hip, dimly lit, and always happening. The bar has a large selection of high end Japanese whiskey and there is an adjoining sake shop where diners can purchase a bottle of sake to enjoy with dinner.

Lastly there is Ryoko's. A family owned sushi restaurant in the heart of the Tenderloin, this divvy spot is the place for late night sushi. They are open everyday from 6 pm until 2 am and have a live DJ on weekends.

Maria Hunt

San Francisco may lack L.A.'s ultra-expensive sushi dens like Urasawa and Nobu, but there are still a handful of places to go for pristine and fresh fish made into sushi. 

Chef Tim Archuleta of Ichi Sushi wows San Francisco sushi fans with his super-fresh and artfully carved nigiri and sashimi, thrilling omakase menus, and dishes like albacore tuna tataki and sea bream with kabosu juice, shiso, green tea salt and yuzu kosho. Soon he and his wife will open a new Ichi with a raw bar, sushi bar, full kitchen and mixed drinks in a larger space at 3282 Mission St.

Ozumo's two locations in San Francisco and the East Bay bring a modern vibe to the sushi experience, from signature Asian-inspired cocktails to specialty rolls to robata grilled skewers. In Oakland, head to Piedmont Avenue to find offers B-Dama, a super authentic spot with a small sushi bar, an ever changing menu of seasonal hot dishes and yakitori. For a more festive time, head down the avenue to Itaba, a new sushi spot sleekly done in natural wood; their generous happy hour offers a selection of rolls and cocktails.

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