What are the best things to order at Colt & Alison?

Answers from Our Experts (1)

Colt & Alison is an upscale steakhouse, so of course meat tops our Forbes Travel Guide editors’ list of the best things to order. Here are dishes you shouldn’t miss at this restaurant inside The Lodge at Sea Island:
 
1. Filet mignon au poivre. Of all the meats on the menu, this one offers the most elaborate presentation. When the peppery 10-ounce cut is nearly finished cooking in the kitchen, it’s brought out to the table and seared. See it set aflame right in front of you.
 
2. The regular filet mignon. If you don’t want a showy presentation, still order the filet mignon, but opt for the flameless version. The regular filet mignon comes in 10 ounces or a petite six, and you can choose a sauce. Purists might choose the horseradish cream or the béarnaise, but we loved the lighter cabernet-shallot sauce.
 
3. The sides. Don’t forget to order some sides to round out your dish. If the addictive truffled mashed potatoes are among the specials, nab them. Otherwise, the jalapeño-cheddar mashed offers a spicy alternative. You can’t go wrong with the classic creamed spinach, either.
 
4. The Porch lemonades. For a refreshing cocktail, try the signature Porch lemonades. The Front Porch is the more southern of the two — it’s made with a special Sea Island blend of Woodford bourbon — while the Back Porch adds in Ketel One Vodka. Both are mixed with egg white, fresh lemon, simple syrup and a thin lemon slice garnish.
 
5. Dessert. You shouldn’t leave the Sea Island restaurant without dessert. The problem is deciding which one. The Gold Brick sundae is a Sea Island favorite and good for those who are children at heart. Three scoops of vanilla ice cream come with a dollop of whipped cream and a cherry. It’s also accompanied with a creamer filled with chocolate sauce; pour the chocolate over the ice cream and watch it harden into a shell. For a more grown-up sweet, get the soufflé (flavors change daily) or the bananas Foster. Like the filet mignon au poivre, the rum-covered dessert gets set on fire tableside.

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