Denver's luxurious art hotel

165 Rooms / 20 Suites

With 200 unique works of art all around the property, it's easy to see how The Art, a Hotel got its name. As you walk through the front door, you’ll get your first dose of creativity by looking up at Leo Villareal's show, a 22,000-light installation that promises to never repeat any patterns. Once inside, you’ll spy two giant paintings by Sol LeWitt and a scale model of Coosje van Bruggen and Claes Oldenburg's Big Sweep — the giant version is in front of the Denver Art Museum, which happens to be next door. Coincidence? Probably not.

Next up: The fourth-floor lobby. As soon as the elevator doors open, you are greeted by the shy Singer holding fresh flowers, an almost life-sized sculpture by German artist Kiki Smith. Beyond stands Otter, a grand horse made out of bronze-cast driftwood created by sculptor Deborah Butterfield. A tapestry by Edward Ruscha drapes over the entirety of another wall.

The Rooms

Those looking to get a dose of creativity don't have to travel far from the artsy Golden Triangle neighborhood, or even leave the confines of the Denver hotel. Even the standard room offers something from the owner's private collection, depending on which floor you stay on.

For example, book accommodations on the ninth floor, nicknamed “Cloud Nine,” and chances are you will have a work by Rob Reynolds in your room. The seventh floor sports Jim Dine's pieces and on the fifth you have Denver-based Clark Richert's paintings. There are five floors and 165 rooms available, and each of the 20 suites is different from the others.

Standard rooms soothe with cool beige and cream, but pop with bits of bright primary colors scattered about. In the bathrooms you will find loads of marble, a chic vanity table with a stool, lighted mirrors and soap shaped like the fish artist Frank Gehry turned into a working lamp sculpture on the main floor.

Each of the unique suites also has a slipper tub, bath balls for said tub, and two sinks that differ from room to room. No matter what level of accommodations you book, the view from the large windows showcases either the mountains, the city or the Denver Art Museum's two buildings and the city’s library. Amenities for all rooms include Illy espresso makers, mini bars stocked with complimentary sodas and snacks, turndown service and luxurious robes.

The Amenities

Exercise and art meet on the self-guided art run, while gym goers will enjoy a modern fitness room on the first floor, a place one might want to hit after indulging in the complimentary candy bowl in the lobby. And even if you don't think you want these free, brightly colored sweet treats, it's worth taking a gander at the color play between classic candies and John Baldessari's eight paintings in the series Eight Soups.

The Food

You’ll want to visit Fire, the restaurant helmed by executive chef Chris Jakubiec. The space features a huge terrace complete with a large fire pit, bar seating and a wrap-around dining room that overlooks the city.

Order the elevated but casual American food for breakfast, lunch or dinner (brunch is served on weekends). Highlights of the menu include Rocky Mountain trout in brown butter, truffle-laced fries, roasted beet salad with ricotta and an intense house burger with bacon, aged cheddar and spicy mayonnaise.

The Area

Designed by Davis Partnership Architects, the façade of the luxury hotel shows bits of other iconic buildings woven into it. Take the box-shaped windows — they pay homage to the Denver Public Library across the street, a building designed by the late Michael Graves. The odd angles of the hotel mimic the way Daniel Libeskind's Denver Art Museum juts out, but to a lesser degree. Then there are the stone walls, a direct salute to History Colorado, which was designed by David Tryba and sits across Broadway from the hotel.

To learn more about the art and history of the building, consider taking one of the public tours or ask the concierge for a private guide. The staff, too, remains knowledgeable about the collection, and each team member completes four hours of art training with the hotel's esteemed curator, Dianne Vanderlip, formerly of the Denver Art Museum.

DETAILS - Insider Information About This Hotel

DETAILS - Insider Information About This Hotel