Angela Corrias

Correspondent

  • Rome, Italy, EUR

Angela Corrias is a freelance travel journalist and photographer who lives in Rome, Italy and covers the city for Forbes Travel Guide. Born in Italy, she left her home country after college and since then she has lived in Dublin, London and Shanghai. Among the others, her work has appeared in Chinese newspaper Global Times, Literary Traveler, GoNomad and Matador Network. She’s happiest when on the road in the perpetual quest for the unknown, capturing colors and flavors around the world for her blog Chasing The Unexpected.

  • On July 23, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best places to buy shoes in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Along with clothing boutiques, Rome also boasts some great places to buy shoes. Stilettos, boots, sandals or decollete, shoes definitely have the power to make or break a look, this is why picking the right piece is of mandatory importance.

    Some of the most exclusive shoe shops are in Piazza di Spagna, the area where you can also find the most famous Italian and international brands for clothes. Albano, at the number 92, and Casadei, at the number 82, sell truly gorgeous, classy and luxurious shoes, often finely embellished with Swarovski crystals or other precious stones or metals, and their prices easily reach 800-900 euros.

    If you don't want to spend a fortune, there are different stores of “Danielle” brand in 39-40 Piazza Risorgimento, 106 Via Ottaviano, 169-171 Via Cola di Rienzo, in Prati area and 85a Via Frattina in the city center. Danielle displays a huge choice of all types of shoes and their prices are not that high, plus for winter and summer sales there are often 30/50 per cent discounts.

    Another place where I often find shoes I like is Fede Lù in Trastevere, 170 Via San Francesco a Ripa, a young shop that sells very modern styles and latest trends of both shoes and accessories.
  • On July 23, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best places to buy shoes in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Along with clothing boutiques, Rome also boasts some great places to buy shoes. Stilettos, boots, sandals or decollete, shoes definitely have the power to make or break a look, this is why picking the right piece is of mandatory importance.

    Some of the most exclusive shoe shops are in Piazza di Spagna, the area where you can also find the most famous Italian and international brands for clothes. Albano, at the number 92, and Casadei, at the number 82, sell truly gorgeous, classy and luxurious shoes, often finely embellished with Swarovski crystals or other precious stones or metals, and their prices easily reach 800-900 euros.

    If you don't want to spend a fortune, there are different stores of “Danielle” brand in 39-40 Piazza Risorgimento, 106 Via Ottaviano, 169-171 Via Cola di Rienzo, in Prati area and 85a Via Frattina in the city center. Danielle displays a huge choice of all types of shoes and their prices are not that high, plus for winter and summer sales there are often 30/50 per cent discounts.

    Another place where I often find shoes I like is Fede Lù in Trastevere, 170 Via San Francesco a Ripa, a young shop that sells very modern styles and latest trends of both shoes and accessories.
  • On July 16, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best fine jewelry stores in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Along with shoes and accessories, what gives a dress an exclusive look is the jewelry, and in Rome it's possible to find beautiful and elegant pieces that can be matched with all types of clothes. Some of the most exclusive jewelry stores are in the city center, such as Bulgari (10, Via dei Condotti) for expensive and gorgeous pieces, or Angeletti, right next to Bulgari in 11 Via dei Condotti, that doesn't only sell jewelry but also watches and crystal, silver and porcelain products.

    Who looks for a store where it's possible to find different brands, from Bulgari to Piaget to Mimì, a great place is Tarascio, in 134 Via Vittorio Veneto and 4 Via Bocca di Leone, where qualified and expert assistants will give you the best tips on how and what to choose according to your clothes or the occasion you need the piece for.

    Specialized in watches from brands of the likes of Rolex, Tudor, Hublot and Baume & Mercier, Bedetti in the very central Piazza San Silvestro, also sells diamonds and rings, necklaces and earrings made with all precious stones such as emeralds and sapphire.
  • On July 15, 2013
    Angela Corrias is now following Briana Palma
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    Briana Palma is now following Angela Corrias
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    Angela Corrias is now following Rustam Panda
  • On June 28, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best festivals in Rome?

    Different seasons different festivals in Rome. The sure thing is that no matter when you go, there is always something to do in the Eternal City.

    Every year in November there is the Festival Internazionale del Film di Roma (Rome's International Film Festival), a huge fair devoted to the cinema, from exhibitions, movies and events to seminars and debates. This year's festival will be November 8th-17th and will take place at the Auditorium Parco della Musica, in 30 Viale Pietro de Coubertin.

    More great festivals in Rome are devoted to jazz music, such as Roma Jazz Festival, held every year in November at the same Aditorium Parco della Musica, or Villa Celimontana Jazz Festival, that takes place in June in the beautiful surroundings of Villa Celimontana park. Both festivals show the performances of some of the best musicians from all over the world.

    Between September and October in Testaccio neighborhood another festival is organized annually, the International Photography Festival, with exhibitions from the best international photographers showcased at MACRO Testaccio museum, in 4 Piazza Orazio Giustiniani.

    Also, every year during springtime the city council devotes one week to culture and art in what is called Settimana della Cultura (Cultural Heritage Week), when state-run museums are open to the public free of charge.
  • On June 26, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    Where is the best pizza in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Even though it's not Naples, also in Rome you can eat an excellent pizza. One of my very favorite places (because, I confess, I'm a fan of Naples-style pizza) is Amalfi in 12 Via dei Gracchi, near the Vatican. Apart from the different types and flavors, the pizza here is perfectly thin and crunchy, just like it's made in its birthplace in Campania.

    If you want to try the Roman-style pizza instead, head to 114, Via del Governo Vecchio, near Piazza Navona, at Pizzeria da Baffetto, where a delicious pizza comes with different toppings, from sausages to mushrooms to cheese (the delicious 4 Formaggi), to mixed veggies.

    Still near the Vatican, right out of Cipro metro station on line A, is Pizzarium, a great place where to find a good choice of pizza by the slice (pizza al taglio).

    Although it's not a strictly pizza-only place but rather a general restaurant, I've had a truly delicious pizza at Pinsa e Buoi dei... (51/53 Viale Carlo Felice) in San Giovanni area. Their pizza is made according to the Roman tradition, oval-shaped and with a mix of three flours, common wheat, rice and soy. Being a restaurant you can order any dish, but if you are a pizza-fan do try their recipe, I ordered the “Parmigiana”, with basil, eggplant, fior di latte (fresh cheese similar to mozzarella) and parmigiano, and it was delicious.
  • On June 26, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    Where is the best pizza in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Even though it's not Naples, also in Rome you can eat an excellent pizza. One of my very favorite places (because, I confess, I'm a fan of Naples-style pizza) is Amalfi in 12 Via dei Gracchi, near the Vatican. Apart from the different types and flavors, the pizza here is perfectly thin and crunchy, just like it's made in its birthplace in Campania.

    If you want to try the Roman-style pizza instead, head to 114, Via del Governo Vecchio, near Piazza Navona, at Pizzeria da Baffetto, where a delicious pizza comes with different toppings, from sausages to mushrooms to cheese (the delicious 4 Formaggi), to mixed veggies.

    Still near the Vatican, right out of Cipro metro station on line A, is Pizzarium, a great place where to find a good choice of pizza by the slice (pizza al taglio).

    Although it's not a strictly pizza-only place but rather a general restaurant, I've had a truly delicious pizza at Pinsa e Buoi dei... (51/53 Viale Carlo Felice) in San Giovanni area. Their pizza is made according to the Roman tradition, oval-shaped and with a mix of three flours, common wheat, rice and soy. Being a restaurant you can order any dish, but if you are a pizza-fan do try their recipe, I ordered the “Parmigiana”, with basil, eggplant, fior di latte (fresh cheese similar to mozzarella) and parmigiano, and it was delicious.
  • On June 26, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best places to see a play in Rome?

    If you want to see a play in Rome, you will be definitely spoiled for choice, as all over the city there are theaters offering the most diverse range of shows.

    In central Largo Argentina is Teatro di Roma, or Teatro Argentina, with a program where classics go side by side with contemporary drama, illustrious collaborations on both a national and international level with a special care for Roman artists and also a space devoted to dance theater and kids' plays.

    Another great theater in Rome is in Via Nazionale, Teatro Eliseo, where the biggest names of Italian cinema have performed, from Totò to Anna Magnani, from Marcello Mastroianni to Vittorio Gassman, Nino Manfredi and Mariangela Melato, with shows directed by directors of the likes of Luchino Visconti.

    If, along with theater plays you like to combine social and political action, do plan a visit to the Teatro Valle Occupato (Occupied Teatro Valle), in 21 Via del Teatro Valle, occupied since 2011 with the aim to make art a key player in social change and direct democracy and the goals of developing new economies not profit-driven.
  • On June 26, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What is the best way to see the Spanish Steps in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Being some of Rome's most popular attractions, Piazza di Spagna and Trinità dei Monti steps, better known as the Spanish Steps, are always crowded. The best way to see the Spanish Steps would obviously be when they are quiet and tourist-free, but needless to say, this is very difficult to happen. No matter what the season, in fact, either the blazing summer heat or winter cold, no weather condition has ever been able to put people off from seating on possibly some of the world's most famous steps.

    This being said, if you really wish to see the actual marble of the Spanish Steps, you can be there around 6-7am, to enjoy the square and the steps in all their beauty, quiet in an almost surreal atmosphere. Not for long though, because as soon as shops and cafeterias open to the public, the steps will start serving their purpose once again until late night.

    However, one can argue that the best way to “see” the Spanish Steps is to actually “experience” them rather than just watching them, and this can be done any time by joining all the tourists and locals while they enjoy a gelato or rest before getting on with their sightseeing, shopping and wandering around.
  • On June 26, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What is the best way to see the Spanish Steps in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Being some of Rome's most popular attractions, Piazza di Spagna and Trinità dei Monti steps, better known as the Spanish Steps, are always crowded. The best way to see the Spanish Steps would obviously be when they are quiet and tourist-free, but needless to say, this is very difficult to happen. No matter what the season, in fact, either the blazing summer heat or winter cold, no weather condition has ever been able to put people off from seating on possibly some of the world's most famous steps.

    This being said, if you really wish to see the actual marble of the Spanish Steps, you can be there around 6-7am, to enjoy the square and the steps in all their beauty, quiet in an almost surreal atmosphere. Not for long though, because as soon as shops and cafeterias open to the public, the steps will start serving their purpose once again until late night.

    However, one can argue that the best way to “see” the Spanish Steps is to actually “experience” them rather than just watching them, and this can be done any time by joining all the tourists and locals while they enjoy a gelato or rest before getting on with their sightseeing, shopping and wandering around.
  • On June 26, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    Where is the best architecture in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Being Rome such an ancient and big city, it goes without saying that it boasts several architectural styles. Century after century, the layers of different cultures, traditions and art styles have built up a diverse city where every neighborhood has its own personality, yet maintaining the eclectic style that defines Rome's beauty.

    Exploring the city's different architectural designs is a way to delve into its history, from its inception up to now. So you have the architecture belonging to the imperial age, ranging from public spaces such as fora and arenas, leisure time places such as amphitheaters like the Colosseum, baths and ancient spas, and private houses, such as the “domus”, among which the Domus Aurea, former Nero's residence, is the most exceptional example.

    Even though there is the belief that Rome kept next to nothing from medieval age, a stroll around many of its neighborhoods downtown, such as Trastevere or Campo de' Fiori, will reveal much of this period. While most of the medieval architecture certainly dates back to the Vatican rule and mainly comprises of churches and basilicas (Santa Maria Maggiore and Santa Maria in Trastevere are beautiful examples), it's also possible to see private residences, piazzas and monuments from the Middle Ages, such as Palazzo dei Cesarini in Salita dei Borgia (Rione Monti), Piazza di Santa Cecilia in Trastevere and Arco degli Acetari near Campo de' Fiori.

    Getting to a more modern period, near Piazza Fiume is Quartiere Coppedè, an outlandish experiment of the Liberty style expressing the Art Nouveau of the Belle Époque bourgeoisie. This style, however, has also less extravagant examples in the Parliament building, Galleria Colonna, today named Galleria Sordi, in Via del Corso, and Palazzina Calzone, designed by architect Vittorio Mascanzoni in proper Paris style.

    In a more modern style, Eur area is a complex of buildings dating back to the Fascist period, commissioned by Mussolini to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of the March on Rome in 1922. Started in 1935, the launch mega event should have taken place in 1941-42. According to the fascist ideology, the architectural style reproduces in a modern way the classical elements of Imperial age.
  • On June 26, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    Where is the best architecture in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Being Rome such an ancient and big city, it goes without saying that it boasts several architectural styles. Century after century, the layers of different cultures, traditions and art styles have built up a diverse city where every neighborhood has its own personality, yet maintaining the eclectic style that defines Rome's beauty.

    Exploring the city's different architectural designs is a way to delve into its history, from its inception up to now. So you have the architecture belonging to the imperial age, ranging from public spaces such as fora and arenas, leisure time places such as amphitheaters like the Colosseum, baths and ancient spas, and private houses, such as the “domus”, among which the Domus Aurea, former Nero's residence, is the most exceptional example.

    Even though there is the belief that Rome kept next to nothing from medieval age, a stroll around many of its neighborhoods downtown, such as Trastevere or Campo de' Fiori, will reveal much of this period. While most of the medieval architecture certainly dates back to the Vatican rule and mainly comprises of churches and basilicas (Santa Maria Maggiore and Santa Maria in Trastevere are beautiful examples), it's also possible to see private residences, piazzas and monuments from the Middle Ages, such as Palazzo dei Cesarini in Salita dei Borgia (Rione Monti), Piazza di Santa Cecilia in Trastevere and Arco degli Acetari near Campo de' Fiori.

    Getting to a more modern period, near Piazza Fiume is Quartiere Coppedè, an outlandish experiment of the Liberty style expressing the Art Nouveau of the Belle Époque bourgeoisie. This style, however, has also less extravagant examples in the Parliament building, Galleria Colonna, today named Galleria Sordi, in Via del Corso, and Palazzina Calzone, designed by architect Vittorio Mascanzoni in proper Paris style.

    In a more modern style, Eur area is a complex of buildings dating back to the Fascist period, commissioned by Mussolini to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of the March on Rome in 1922. Started in 1935, the launch mega event should have taken place in 1941-42. According to the fascist ideology, the architectural style reproduces in a modern way the classical elements of Imperial age.
  • On June 26, 2013
    Rustam Panda is now following Angela Corrias