Angela Corrias

Correspondent

  • Rome, Italy, EUR

Angela Corrias is a freelance travel journalist and photographer who lives in Rome, Italy and covers the city for Forbes Travel Guide. Born in Italy, she left her home country after college and since then she has lived in Dublin, London and Shanghai. Among the others, her work has appeared in Chinese newspaper Global Times, Literary Traveler, GoNomad and Matador Network. She’s happiest when on the road in the perpetual quest for the unknown, capturing colors and flavors around the world for her blog Chasing The Unexpected.

  • On March 19, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best museums in Rome?

    Selecting what are the best museums in Rome is almost a paradoxical endeavor, as the city itself is a huge open-air art gallery. Even though places like the Vatican Museums, the Musei Capitolini and the Museo e Galleria Borghese have been welcoming hundreds of visitors daily for years, none of Rome's museums has ever started showing any sign of cooling.

    First-timers cannot miss Michelangelo's frescoes painted on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel as one of the highlights of the Vatican Museums, along with the other exhibitions part of the complex, such as the Egyptian Museum, the Etruscan Museum and the Pinacoteca Vaticana.

    If you haven't overdosed on papal residences and religious art yet, after the Vatican Museums head to Castel Sant'Angelo, just across Via della Conciliazione, home to the National Museum of Castel Sant'Angelo, showcasing popes' mansions, the remains of Emperor Hadrian's Mausoleum and the fortified castle.

    Close to Piazza Venezia, the Musei Capitolini, located on Capitoline Hill, allegedly where the city's first settlement was created, offer a fascinating journey through Roman ancient history and Patricians' home decorations.

    If you fancy a stroll in the park while staying in the city center, head to Villa Borghese, Rome's green pride, within which you will find another marvelous art gallery, Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Moderna e Contemporanea (GNAM), housing, among the others, masterpieces by artists of the likes of Antonio Canova, Paul Cézanne, Claude Monet and Vincent Van Gogh.
  • On March 18, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What is the best time to visit Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Rome is a great destination all year round, with something to do every day. Apart from the main attractions, activities and events, every period offers a different angle of the city.

    If you can't stand hot temperatures, you might want to avoid the summer months of July and August, and rather choose to travel around May/June or September/October, when weather conditions are ideal for outdoor activities and sightseeing, neither too hot nor cold. End of November and December can be a bit rainy, but Rome offers so many indoor options that rain won't be much of a problem, and generally speaking, autumn has mild temperatures and an overall pleasant climate for sightseeing.

    Winter in Rome can be cold, but never unbearably so, and around Christmas the city glows with season decorations and becomes lively thanks to its Christmas markets, such as the famous one in Piazza Navona, and hectic shopping all around. As the end of winter approaches, festivals and open-air concerts, kicking off with the one in San Giovanni every May 1st, are organized in many of the city's venues, such as the Circus Maximus and the Theater in the Caracalla Baths, from springtime through all the summer months.

    Rome welcomes tourists all year, but summer, Christmas and Easter are usually the busiest periods, and museums and attractions can be crowded, while in less busy days sightseeing is more enjoyable.
  • On March 18, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What is the best time to visit Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Rome is a great destination all year round, with something to do every day. Apart from the main attractions, activities and events, every period offers a different angle of the city.

    If you can't stand hot temperatures, you might want to avoid the summer months of July and August, and rather choose to travel around May/June or September/October, when weather conditions are ideal for outdoor activities and sightseeing, neither too hot nor cold. End of November and December can be a bit rainy, but Rome offers so many indoor options that rain won't be much of a problem, and generally speaking, autumn has mild temperatures and an overall pleasant climate for sightseeing.

    Winter in Rome can be cold, but never unbearably so, and around Christmas the city glows with season decorations and becomes lively thanks to its Christmas markets, such as the famous one in Piazza Navona, and hectic shopping all around. As the end of winter approaches, festivals and open-air concerts, kicking off with the one in San Giovanni every May 1st, are organized in many of the city's venues, such as the Circus Maximus and the Theater in the Caracalla Baths, from springtime through all the summer months.

    Rome welcomes tourists all year, but summer, Christmas and Easter are usually the busiest periods, and museums and attractions can be crowded, while in less busy days sightseeing is more enjoyable.
  • On March 15, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best bars in Rome?

    Anything involving coffee, drinks and social life, in Rome is very important, this is why the city literally bristles with bars and cafeterias. When it comes to coffee, I'm particularly picky, and my espresso always needs to be high-quality and creamy in order for me to fully enjoy it.

    When I feel like treating myself with a proper high-end, freshly brewed coffee, or a "Moretto" made with coffee, cocoa and milk foam, or a heavenly hot chocolate, I make my way to Sant'Eustachio Il Caffè, in 82 Piazza Sant'Eustachio, near the Pantheon, open every day until late, sure that they never let me down.

    If you wish to sample some of the best Italian and international wines, go to Enoteca Buccone in 19/20 Via di Ripetta, just a stone's throw away from Piazza del Popolo. Here you can try your favorite wines along with fine snacks, appetizers and flakes of Grana cheese. By booking a week in advance, the owners will even arrange a special tasting and explain to you the different properties and qualities of each wine, matching each sip with local delicacies.

    Another lovely place downtown is Eno Retrò, in 46 Via delle Carrozze, near Piazza di Spagna, a trendy wine/cocktail bar decorated vintage-style. Open Monday to Saturday from 4pm until midnight, they often host also jazz concerts and cultural events.

    For a mid-morning or mid-afternoon break, if you are around Via Ottaviano or Via Cola di Rienzo, stop at  Castroni, store/bistro/cafeteria serving and selling the finest delicacies from around the world, from a huge tea selection to great coffee, pastries and cakes.
  • On March 15, 2013
  • On March 15, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best restaurants in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Picking the best restaurants in a constantly evolving food scene like the one in Rome is no easy task. In a country that prides itself as one of the best food havens in the world, its capital is naturally a place where you can find exquisite cuisine and have the finest dining experiences.

    While some of the most popular restaurants are the widely acclaimed Il Pagliaccio, Glass Hostaria in Trastevere or the Trattoria San Teodoro near the Fori Imperiali, I always like discovering new eateries around the city.

    When I crave fish, my first option is Ristorante I Quattro Mori, in 8/a Via Santa Maria delle Fornaci, just behind the Vatican, serving the finest dishes from Sardinia's tradition in a personal, revisited way, while for a great meal from the local culinary legacy blended with other Mediterranean schools and enjoyed in a cozy atmosphere, I go to Pinsa e Buoi Dei..., near San Giovanni in Laterano Basilica. Here some of my picks are the supplì appetizers, different types of mouthwatering bruschette made with homemade bread, gnocchi di patate with porcini mushrooms and the deliciously crunchy "pinsa", oval-shaped pizza, typical of the Roman tradition.

    Vegetarians will love the Taverna Vegetariana, in 94 Via Trionfale, a 10-minute walk from Ottaviano metro station, where for affordable prices they will have a tempting choice of dishes from Italian traditional cuisine in a vegetarian version, many of which suitable also for vegans, prepared with handpicked local produce. Their pasta and desserts are homemade.

    Finally, if I fancy Mediterranean flavors Middle Eastern style, one of my first choices is Mandaloun Lebanese Restaurant in 16 Via di Porta Pinciana, near Via Veneto, where I always order their unbeatable Mezeh.
  • On March 15, 2013
    Angela Corrias answered the question: Angela Corrias

    What are the best restaurants in Rome?

    Photo by Angela Corrias Picking the best restaurants in a constantly evolving food scene like the one in Rome is no easy task. In a country that prides itself as one of the best food havens in the world, its capital is naturally a place where you can find exquisite cuisine and have the finest dining experiences.

    While some of the most popular restaurants are the widely acclaimed Il Pagliaccio, Glass Hostaria in Trastevere or the Trattoria San Teodoro near the Fori Imperiali, I always like discovering new eateries around the city.

    When I crave fish, my first option is Ristorante I Quattro Mori, in 8/a Via Santa Maria delle Fornaci, just behind the Vatican, serving the finest dishes from Sardinia's tradition in a personal, revisited way, while for a great meal from the local culinary legacy blended with other Mediterranean schools and enjoyed in a cozy atmosphere, I go to Pinsa e Buoi Dei..., near San Giovanni in Laterano Basilica. Here some of my picks are the supplì appetizers, different types of mouthwatering bruschette made with homemade bread, gnocchi di patate with porcini mushrooms and the deliciously crunchy "pinsa", oval-shaped pizza, typical of the Roman tradition.

    Vegetarians will love the Taverna Vegetariana, in 94 Via Trionfale, a 10-minute walk from Ottaviano metro station, where for affordable prices they will have a tempting choice of dishes from Italian traditional cuisine in a vegetarian version, many of which suitable also for vegans, prepared with handpicked local produce. Their pasta and desserts are homemade.

    Finally, if I fancy Mediterranean flavors Middle Eastern style, one of my first choices is Mandaloun Lebanese Restaurant in 16 Via di Porta Pinciana, near Via Veneto, where I always order their unbeatable Mezeh.
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