Erica Firpo

Correspondent

  • Rome, Italy, Europe

Erica Firpo writes about art, culture and travel for online and print publications such as The Huffington Post, New York Times, Globespotters, The Guardian, BBC Travel and Cathay Pacific’s Discovery Magazine. She is Luxe Guide’s Rome editor. With Rome as home base, she loves to travel the Mediterranean in search of contemporary art and culture as well as traces of the Ancient Roman Empire.

  • On March 25, 2013
    Erica Firpo answered the question: Erica Firpo

    What are the best wine bars in Rome?

    Photo by Erica Firpo In Rome, your allegiance to the local enoteca (wine bar) is on par with your fidelity to Roma or Lazio, the two local soccer teams. But since each neighborhood has several enoteche, from quaint and traditional to stylish and trendy, you are allowed a piccolo tradimento (tiny betrayal) on occasion. My favorite enoteche in Rome (and in no preferential order) are:

    Il Goccetto often considered one of the oldest wine bars in Rome. Il Goccetto has all the rustic charm that I need for a traditional wine bar, a great selection of wines and a delicious antipasto menu. Location is perfect, a charming side street between the Tiber river and Campo de’ Fiori that side steps the college crowd.  On the other side of Campo de’ Fiori is Angolo Divino, via dei Balestrari 12, another rustic wine bar with slightly more space and a lovely wine list and antipasto menu, though availability is dependent on the owner’s whims. Another favorite in the nearby Ghetto neighborhood is Beppe e Suoi Formaggi, an incredible cheese and wine shop frequented by many gastro-tourists.

    Other neighborhood enoteche that have caught my eye and palate are Monti’s Ai Tre Scalini (unmistakable on the corner of via Panisperna and Via dei Serpenti), a rustic wine bar and the recently renovated Le Barrique at via del Boschetto 41, who’s mod remake also includes a dinner menu, and Trastevere’s quiet Uva Rara on via di San Crisogono 31.

    If looking to learn more about Lazio, head toward Piazza di Spagna to Palatium which focuses on Lazio region vintages, or else Enoteca Provincia Romana (Piazza Venezia) whose Rome-focused menu of wines also includes notable products from the region.
  • On March 25, 2013
    Erica Firpo is now following the question:
  • On March 25, 2013
    Erica Firpo answered the question: Erica Firpo

    What are the best kid-friendly restaurants in Rome?

    "What are the best kid-friendly restaurants?" is perhaps my favorite question to answer regarding Rome's dining scene because (almost) every restaurant in Rome happily accommodates children.  Italy is a very child-friendly country and dining with children is part of daily life so it is not unusual to see big and small children out to dinner until the late hours.  Children in Rome are definitely seen and heard, so let your little one enjoy him or herself.  For those with dietary, though it is rare to see a “child’s menu” in Rome, you can always ask for mezzo porzione (half portion) of any pastas. Likewise, waitstaff will not blink an eye if you order off menu for simpler dishes such as pasta bianca (butter and parmesan) and pasta rossa (tomato sauce)- both favorites among the toddler set.

    For fun restaurants that will definitely leave a lasting impression on kids, the Trastevere area seems to have the cache. Taverna Trilussa, a local haunt with very abundant and Roman menu, mixes its pastas in parmesan and pecorino rounds or serves its concoctions in the large pans used to cook the dishes.  In the quieter side of Trastevere (closer to the Tiber river) Roma Sparita sits in Piazza Santa Cecilia, often good for a bit of supervised running around while waiting for the caciopepe- a pasta with pecorino cheese and pepper in an edible pecorino bowl.
  • On March 25, 2013
    Erica Firpo answered the question: Erica Firpo

    What is the best way to see Rome in one day?

    PHoto by Nicolee Drake Though Rome was not built in a day, it is quite possible to see the Eternal City in a single twenty-four hour period. With a bit of research, a great pair of walking shoes and a lot of protein, get ready to conquer Rome in one day. First and foremost, know what you want to see. Rome's most visited, and subsequently most important attractions, include the Sistine Chapel (Vatican Museums), Roman Forum and the Colosseum. Avoid the crowds and tedious waits by taking advantage of the 21st century with advance purchase tickets for Vatican Museums and Forum/Colosseum tickets. The Vatican Museums ticket is a timed entrance, and best left for an after lunch visit to avoid the crowds.  The Roman Forum/Colosseum ticket is an open entrance, but if visiting Rome in the summer months, the best advice is to start in the early morning for cooler temperatures.

    With your morning and late afternoon bracketed with two must-see visits, the rest of the day (and Rome) is yours to tailor to your preferences. Rome has a gregarious squad of "hop on/hop off" double-decker buses that circumnavigate the city, providing great perspective on the dimensions of the city and its unlimited cultural heritage.  Hop On/Hop off buses are as generic as the standard Red Bus tour known as Trambus Open 110, which visits almost all of Rome's historic piazzas (including Trevi and Navona) and sites (Vatican, Colosseum), or else they are themed to relevant topics such as archaeology and christianity

    Finally, the evening is yours.  Rome's piazza are best seen under the glow of street lights and an inky blue black sky. Walking around Rome's beloved piazzas like Navona, Popolo, Trevi, Venezia and even Barberini in the evenings re-creates that dolce vita atmosphere and if you haven't already done so, you will definitely fall in love with Rome.
  • On March 25, 2013
    Erica Firpo answered the question: Erica Firpo

    What is the best way to see Rome in one day?

    PHoto by Nicolee Drake Though Rome was not built in a day, it is quite possible to see the Eternal City in a single twenty-four hour period. With a bit of research, a great pair of walking shoes and a lot of protein, get ready to conquer Rome in one day. First and foremost, know what you want to see. Rome's most visited, and subsequently most important attractions, include the Sistine Chapel (Vatican Museums), Roman Forum and the Colosseum. Avoid the crowds and tedious waits by taking advantage of the 21st century with advance purchase tickets for Vatican Museums and Forum/Colosseum tickets. The Vatican Museums ticket is a timed entrance, and best left for an after lunch visit to avoid the crowds.  The Roman Forum/Colosseum ticket is an open entrance, but if visiting Rome in the summer months, the best advice is to start in the early morning for cooler temperatures.

    With your morning and late afternoon bracketed with two must-see visits, the rest of the day (and Rome) is yours to tailor to your preferences. Rome has a gregarious squad of "hop on/hop off" double-decker buses that circumnavigate the city, providing great perspective on the dimensions of the city and its unlimited cultural heritage.  Hop On/Hop off buses are as generic as the standard Red Bus tour which visits almost all of Rome's historic piazzas (including Trevi and Navona) and sites (Vatican, Colosseum), or else they are themed to relevant topics such as archaeology and christianity. 

    Finally, the evening is yours.  Rome's piazza are best seen under the glow of street lights and an inky blue black sky. Walking around Rome's beloved piazzas like Navona, Popolo, Trevi, Venezia and even Barberini in the evenings re-creates that dolce vita atmosphere and if you haven't already done so, you will definitely fall in love with Rome.
  • On March 25, 2013
    Erica Firpo answered the question: Erica Firpo

    What is the best way to see Rome in one day?

    PHoto by Nicolee Drake Though Rome was not built in a day, it is quite possible to see the Eternal City in a single twenty-four hour period. With a bit of research, a great pair of walking shoes and a lot of protein, get ready to conquer Rome in one day. 
    First and foremost, know what you want to see. Rome's most visited, and subsequently most important attractions, include the Sistine Chapel (Vatican Museums), Roman Forum and the Colosseum. Avoid the crowds and tedious waits by taking advantage of the 21st century with advance purchase tickets for Vatican Museums and Forum/Colosseum tickets. The Vatican Museums ticket is a timed entrance, and best left for an after lunch visit to avoid the crowds.  The Roman Forum/Colosseum ticket is an open entrance, but if visiting Rome in the summer months, the best advice is to start in the early morning for cooler temperatures.

    With your morning and late afternoon bracketed with two must-see visits, the rest of the day (and Rome) is yours to tailor to your preferences. Rome has a gregarious squad of "hop on/hop off" double-decker buses that circumnavigate the city, providing great perspective on the dimensions of the city and its unlimited cultural heritage.  Hop On/Hop off buses are as generic as the standard Red Bus tour which visits almost all of Rome's historic piazzas (including Trevi and Navona) and sites (Vatican, Colosseum), or else they are themed to relevant topics such as archaeology and christianity. 

    Finally, the evening is yours.  Rome's piazza are best seen under the glow of street lights and an inky blue black sky. Walking around Rome's beloved piazzas like Navona, Popolo, Trevi, Venezia and even Barberini in the evenings re-creates that dolce vita atmosphere and if you haven't already done so, you will definitely fall in love with Rome.
  • On March 25, 2013
    Erica Firpo answered the question: Erica Firpo

    What is the best way to see Rome in one day?

    PHoto by Nicolee Drake
    First and foremost, know what you want to see. Rome's most visited, and subsequently most important attractions, include the Sistine Chapel (Vatican Museums), Roman Forum and the Colosseum. Avoid the crowds and tedious waits by taking advantage of the 21st century with advance purchase tickets for Vatican Museums and Forum/Colosseum tickets. The Vatican Museums ticket is a timed entrance, and best left for an after lunch visit to avoid the crowds.  The Roman Forum/Colosseum ticket is an open entrance, but if visiting Rome in the summer months, the best advice is to start in the early morning for cooler temperatures.

    With your morning and late afternoon bracketed with two must-see visits, the rest of the day (and Rome) is yours to tailor to your preferences. Rome has a gregarious squad of "hop on/hop off" double-decker buses that circumnavigate the city, providing great perspective on the dimensions of the city and its unlimited cultural heritage.  Hop On/Hop off buses are as generic as the standard Red Bus tour which visits almost all of Rome's historic piazzas (including Trevi and Navona) and sites (Vatican, Colosseum), or else they are themed to relevant topics such as archaeology and christianity. 

    Finally, the evening is yours.  Rome's piazza are best seen under the glow of street lights and an inky blue black sky. Walking around Rome's beloved piazzas like Navona, Popolo, Trevi, Venezia and even Barberini in the evenings re-creates that dolce vita atmosphere and if you haven't already done so, you will definitely fall in love with Rome.
  • On March 25, 2013
    Erica Firpo answered the question: Erica Firpo

    What is the best way to see Rome in one day?

    PHoto by Nicolee Drake Though Rome was not built in a day, it is quite possible to see the Eternal City in a single twenty-four hour period. With a bit of research, a great pair of walking shoes and a lot of protein, get ready to conquer Rome in one day.
    First and foremost, know what you want to see. Rome's most visited, and subsequently most important attractions, include the Sistine Chapel (Vatican Museums), Roman Forum and the Colosseum. Avoid the crowds and tedious waits by taking advantage of the 21st century with advance purchase tickets for Vatican Museums and Forum/Colosseum tickets. The Vatican Museums ticket is a timed entrance, and best left for an after lunch visit to avoid the crowds.  The Roman Forum/Colosseum ticket is an open entrance, but if visiting Rome in the summer months, the best advice is to start in the early morning for cooler temperatures.

    With your morning and late afternoon bracketed with two must-see visits, the rest of the day (and Rome) is yours to tailor to your preferences. Rome has a gregarious squad of "hop on/hop off" double-decker buses that circumnavigate the city, providing great perspective on the dimensions of the city and its unlimited cultural heritage.  Hop On/Hop off buses are as generic as the standard Red Bus tour which visits almost all of Rome's historic piazzas (including Trevi and Navona) and sites (Vatican, Colosseum), or else they are themed to relevant topics such as archaeology and christianity. 

    Finally, the evening is yours.  Rome's piazza are best seen under the glow of street lights and an inky blue black sky. Walking around Rome's beloved piazzas like Navona, Popolo, Trevi, Venezia and even Barberini in the evenings re-creates that dolce vita atmosphere and if you haven't already done so, you will definitely fall in love with Rome.
  • On March 25, 2013
    Erica Firpo answered the question: Erica Firpo

    What is the best way to see Rome in one day?

    PHoto by Nicolee Drake Though Rome was not built in a day, it is quite possible to see the Eternal City in a single twenty-four hour period. With a bit of research, a great pair of walking shoes and a lot of protein, get ready to conquer Rome in one day. First and foremost, know what you want to see. Rome's most visited, and subsequently most important attractions, include the Sistine Chapel (Vatican Museums), Roman Forum and the Colosseum. Avoid the crowds and tedious waits by taking advantage of the 21st century with advance purchase tickets for Vatican Museums and Forum/Colosseum tickets. The Vatican Museums ticket is a timed entrance, and best left for an after lunch visit to avoid the crowds.  The Roman Forum/Colosseum ticket is an open entrance, but if visiting Rome in the summer months, the best advice is to start in the early morning for cooler temperatures.

    With your morning and late afternoon bracketed with two must-see visits, the rest of the day (and Rome) is yours to tailor to your preferences. Rome has a gregarious squad of "hop on/hop off" double-decker buses that circumnavigate the city, providing great perspective on the dimensions of the city and its unlimited cultural heritage.  Hop On/Hop off buses are as generic as the standard Red Bus tour which visits almost all of Rome's historic piazzas (including Trevi and Navona) and sites (Vatican, Colosseum), or else they are themed to relevant topics such as archaeology and christianity. 

    Finally, the evening is yours.  Rome's piazza are best seen under the glow of street lights and an inky blue black sky. Walking around Rome's beloved piazzas like Navona, Popolo, Trevi, Venezia and even Barberini in the evenings re-creates that dolce vita atmosphere and if you haven't already done so, you will definitely fall in love with Rome.
  • On March 25, 2013
    Erica Firpo answered the question: Erica Firpo

    What is the best way to see Rome in one day?

    PHoto by Nicolee Drake Though Rome was not built in a day, it is quite possible to see the Eternal City in a single twenty-four hour period. With a bit of research, a great pair of walking shoes and a lot of protein, get ready to conquer Rome in one day.

    First and foremost, know what you want to see. Rome's most visited, and subsequently most important attractions, include the Sistine Chapel (Vatican Museums), Roman Forum and the Colosseum. Avoid the crowds and tedious waits by taking advantage of the 21st century with advance purchase tickets for Vatican Museums and Forum/Colosseum tickets. The Vatican Museums ticket is a timed entrance, and best left for an after lunch visit to avoid the crowds.  The Roman Forum/Colosseum ticket is an open entrance, but if visiting Rome in the summer months, the best advice is to start in the early morning for cooler temperatures.

    With your morning and late afternoon bracketed with two must-see visits, the rest of the day (and Rome) is yours to tailor to your preferences. Rome has a gregarious squad of "hop on/hop off" double-decker buses that circumnavigate the city, providing great perspective on the dimensions of the city and its unlimited cultural heritage.  Hop On/Hop off buses are as generic as the standard Red Bus tour which visits almost all of Rome's historic piazzas (including Trevi and Navona) and sites (Vatican, Colosseum), or else they are themed to relevant topics such as archaeology and christianity. 

    Finally, the evening is yours.  Rome's piazza are best seen under the glow of street lights and an inky blue black sky. Walking around Rome's beloved piazzas like Navona, Popolo, Trevi, Venezia and even Barberini in the evenings re-creates that dolce vita atmosphere and if you haven't already done so, you will definitely fall in love with Rome.
  • On March 25, 2013
    Erica Firpo answered the question: Erica Firpo

    What is the best way to see Rome in one day?

    PHoto by Nicolee Drake Though Rome was not built in a day, it is quite possible to see the Eternal City in a single twenty-four hour period. With a bit of research, a great pair of walking shoes and a lot of protein, get ready to conquer Rome in one day.

    First and foremost, know what you want to see. Rome's most visited, and subsequently most important attractions, include the Sistine Chapel (Vatican Museums), Roman Forum and the Colosseum. Avoid the crowds and tedious waits by taking advantage of the 21st century with advance purchase tickets for Vatican Museums and Forum/Colosseum tickets. The Vatican Museums ticket is a timed entrance, and best left for an after lunch visit to avoid the crowds.  The Roman Forum/Colosseum ticket is an open entrance, but if visiting Rome in the summer months, the best advice is to start in the early morning for cooler temperatures.

    With your morning and late afternoon bracketed with two must-see visits, the rest of the day (and Rome) is yours to tailor to your preferences. Rome has a gregarious squad of "hop on/hop off" double-decker buses that circumnavigate the city, providing great perspective on the dimensions of the city and its unlimited cultural heritage.  Hop On/Hop off buses are as generic as the standard Red Bus tour which visits almost all of Rome's historic piazzas (including Trevi and Navona) and sites (Vatican, Colosseum), or else they are themed to relevant topics such as archaeology and christianity. 

    Finally, the evening is yours.  Rome's piazza are best seen under the glow of street lights
  • On March 25, 2013
    Erica Firpo is now following Carissa Chesanek
  • On March 25, 2013
    Erica Firpo answered the question: Erica Firpo

    What are the best clothing boutiques in Rome?

    Rome has several clothing boutiques that, depending on what you are looking for, can be considered the very best.  The city is choc-a-bloc with shops my grandmother has been going to since she was a child along side the very contemporary concept shops that the 21st century birthed. My suggestion is to head to the Piazza di Spagna area which has been undergoing urban renewal in both the side streets and the square itself.

    While enjoying the windows of stores like Prada and Miumiu, make sure to walk into the smaller shops of the area, especially Alexander, Galassia, Eleonora and Gente. These boutiques are full of very fun eye candy and stock unique pieces from Italian and international designers including Rick Owens, Azzaro, Balmain, Chloe, Krizia, Kenzo et al.  Along the same streets keep your eyes open for tiny traditional shops that harken days of yore. Via Frattina's Luisa Venier is known for her lace and Brighenti is a favorite for lingerie and swimwear.  On via Babuino, be on the look out for  C.I.R Corredi, a boutique full of delicious hand-made wonders such as smocked blouses and linens.  Nearby via Fontanella Borghese has the very old favorite Schostal, a boutique specializing in traditional shirts, ties, socks and undergarments for men, as well as some items for women.
  • On March 22, 2013
    Erica Firpo answered the question: Erica Firpo

    Where is the best shopping in Rome?

    Photo by Erica Firpo Shopping in Rome is quite easy as every neighborhood has artisanal boutiques, well known brands and souvenir shops. In general, Rome’s shopping is focused in and around Piazza di Spagna.  The piazza and streets leading to it, via dei Condotti, via del Babuino and via Frattina, are home to Italy’s home-grown brands such as Dolce & Gabbana, Sergio Rossi, Missoni, Prada, Gucci, and Ferragamo.
     
    The nearby Via del Corso provides a different kind of eye-candy, with less expensive brands geared towards a much younger clientele as hipsters-in-training peruse for treasures at shops like Dada, Subdued, Energie and Diesel.  If labels are less your fancy, neighborhoods Monti and Navona are overflowing now with boutiques promoting made-in-Rome artisans from jewelry and clothing to shoes and mosaics.  Trastevere always seems to be a favorite for those looking to avoid the trendy/tourist vibe of other neighborhoods. Even though the neighborhood has long since gentrified, there are many charming shops worth a perusal.

    Market lovers can still find surprises at local open markets such as Sunday's Porta Portese in Trastevere and Monday-Saturday's Via Sannio (in San Giovannni area), but these are less and less treasure troves for vintage hunters.