Leanne Mirandilla

Correspondent

  • Hong Kong, China, Asia

Leanne Mirandilla is a correspondent who lives in Hong Kong and covers the city for Forbes Travel Guide. She is a staff writer at HK Magazine, a weekly lifestyle publication and proclaimed Hong Kong city-living authority, and the associate editor of The List, a local, biweekly how-to magazine. Having grown up in Hong Kong, she left for the States to attend Dartmouth College before returning to the city she calls home, where she enjoys soaking up culture and sampling the various delicious cuisines. Her work has also appeared in Where Hong Kong and RAW Magazine.

  • On September 19
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  • On August 11, 2013
    Sara Tomovic is now following Leanne Mirandilla
  • On May 15, 2013
  • On May 6, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    Where can you get the best view of Hong Kong?

    Hong Kong is well-known for many things - shopping, dining and nightlife, for instance - but the one activity you definitely shouldn't miss out on is taking in the city view. Fortunately, this can be done in a multitude of ways:

    - Visit one of the city's main attractions, Victoria Peak - also known as merely the Peak - and get a ticket to gain entry to the Sky Terrace 428. While the Peak has other terraces where entry is free, those lack the spectacular 360° views of the Sky Terrace. You'll also get to experience the funicular railway on the ride up, which was originally built in the 19th century.

    - Make a reservation at one of the many rooftop bars around the city and take in the views over a cocktail or three. Ozone, on the 118th floor of the Ritz-Carlton, is a good choice, offering sky high views of the Victoria Harbour and beyond.

    - You can get gorgeous views on a number of hiking trails - Dragon's Back and certain sections of the sprawling MacLehose Trail are two popular choices. Be advised that the MacLehose Trail can be challenging, so it might be best to attempt it if you're a more experienced hiker.

    - For a truly memorable experience, take a helicopter ride over the harbour through the Peninsula hotel. You can even combine your flight with a meal or a spa experience if you really want to class it up.

    - Finally, you can take in the rolling hillside views while riding a cable car. There's the Ngong Ping 360 in Lantau Island, which is close to a number of other attractions including the Big Buddha, the Po Lin Monastery and the themed Ngong Ping Village. There's also the original cable car in Ocean Park in Aberdeen, but you'll need a ticket for the amusement park proper to ride it.
  • On May 6, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What is the tipping etiquette in Hong Kong?

    Tipping, for the most part, is not required in Hong Kong. Most dining establishments add a 10% service charge onto your bill, although more restaurants are cropping up with "no service charge" policies. This is usually stated at the bottom of the menu or of your bill. Even in these cases, adding around 10% extra is polite - unless your dining experience was wholly negative and not worthy of the charge to begin with. Whether the service charge actually goes where it's supposed to is debatable, though.

    Taxi drivers generally do not get tipped - unless you're leaving a few coins' worth of change or you're particularly happy with the service provided. Hairdressers, employees at beauty salons and hotel staff do get given tips. Though not required, it's also not unheard of to leave tips for bartenders.
  • On May 6, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What is the tipping etiquette in Hong Kong?

    Tipping, for the most part, is not required in Hong Kong. Most dining establishments add a 10% service charge onto your bill, although more restaurants are cropping up with "no service charge" policies. Even in these case, adding around 10% extra is polite - unless your dining experience was wholly negative and not worthy of the charge to begin with.

    Taxi drivers generally do not get tipped - unless you're leaving a few coins' worth of change or you're particularly happy with the service provided. Hairdressers, employees at beauty salons and hotel staff do get given tips. Bartenders also get covered in the aforementioned service charge, though it's fairly common to leave a bit extra.
  • On May 6, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    What should I pack for a trip to Hong Kong?

    It's easy enough to pick up a forgotten piece of clothing or toiletry item at one of the city's many shops or malls, but for convenience's sake you'd do well to take a few staple items with you.

    - Layers. A light jacket is a must. In the summer it may be hot and humid outside, but indoors the air-conditioning is often running at full blast; it's surprisingly easy to catch colds from switching between hot to cool so frequently.

    - A warm jacket and tights for winter when temperatures can dip to 10°F at their coldest.

    - A good, comfortable pair of walking shoes. A lot of the city can be seen on foot, so a good pair of sneakers or flats will do. It will also make scaling the city's hilly terrain that much easier. If hiking is your thing, your might want to bring a hardier pair of shoes.

    - An umbrella or rain jacket for those inevitable sudden showers.

    - Swimwear in the summer if you're looking to hit up the beach.

    - A couple of formal outfits. Hong Kong is a relatively more dressy city, and while exploring the city in casual where is perfectly fine, dining out at a nice restaurant or heading to a club will require something a little classier. Not that all of these establishments have explicit dress codes per se, but it will definitely help you blend in.
  • On May 6, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    When is the best time to visit Hong Kong?

    There are clear "good" and "bad" times to visit this subtropical city. The summers - from June to September, or thereabouts - are swelteringly hot and humid. Temperatures in summer can reach up to 90°F and humidity year-round ranges from between 75 to 87 per cent; don't visit then unless you either have a high tolerance for heat or don't mind spending the majority of your time indoors enjoying the almost-ubiquitous icy cold air conditioning.

    The weather gradually starts getting cooler from November onwards, typically bottoming out at around 50°F on its coldest days. Though it might not sound like much, central heating isn't as commonly found as it is in other, colder countries. The best time to visit, therefore, is squarely between September and November - a short window where the weather is cool and balmy.

    Other climatic aspects to take into consideration include rain and typhoons: as a coastal city, Hong Kong is subjected to monsoons, with heavy rainfall during April and occassional storms through summer. Typhoons - tropical cyclones - are known to occur through summer and fall. The Hong Kong Observatory advises people stay indoors if a signal of 8 or over is hoisted, but this signal typically doesn't last for more than a couple of days. Typhoon signal 10 - which warns for hurricane force winds, among others - has only been raised twice within the last 15 years or so.
  • On May 6, 2013
  • On May 6, 2013
  • On May 6, 2013
    Leanne Mirandilla answered the question: Leanne Mirandilla

    When is the best time to visit Hong Kong?

    There are clear "good" and "bad" times to visit this subtropical city. The summers - from June to September, or thereabouts - are swelteringly hot and humid. Temperatures in summer can reach up to 90°F and humidity year-round ranges from between 75 to 87%; don't visit then unless you either have a high tolerance for heat or don't mind spending the majority of your time indoors enjoying the almost-ubiquitous icy cold air conditioning.

    The weather gradually starts getting cooler from November onwards, typically bottoming out at around 50°F on its coldest days. Though it might not sound like much, central heating isn't as commonly found as it is in other, colder countries. The best time to visit, therefore, is squarely between September and November - a short window where the weather is cool and balmy.

    Other climatic aspects to take into consideration include rain and typhoons: as a coastal city, Hong Kong is subjected to monsoons, with heavy rainfall during April and occassional storms through summer. Typhoons - tropical cyclones - are known to occur through summer and fall. The Hong Kong Observatory advises people stay indoors if a signal of 8 or over is hoisted, but this signal typically doesn't last for more than a couple of days. Typhoon signal 10 - which warns for hurricane force winds, among others - has only been raised twice within the last 15 years or so.
  • On May 2, 2013
  • On April 23, 2013
  • On April 1, 2013