Nicholas Coldicott

Correspondent

  • Tokyo, Japan, Asia

Nicholas Coldicott is a correspondent who covers Tokyo for Forbes Travel Guide. A Tokyo resident since 1998, he is the former editor of Eat Magazine and Whisky Magazine Japan. Coldicott also was the editor of three Time Out Tokyo guides, a columnist for The Japan Times, and has written about Japan for Food and Travel, The Guardian, Sydney Morning Herald and many other publications.

  • On April 17, 2013
  • On April 11, 2013
    Nicholas Coldicott answered the question: Nicholas Coldicott

    What is the tipping etiquette in Tokyo?

    Don’t do it. Not at hotels, not in taxis, not in restaurants, nor in bars. And there’s no need to tip a masseuse. There’s no tipping culture in Japan, and offering one could lead to an awkward stand-off.

    If someone is going out of their way to accommodate you in some way, it’s polite to take a well-packaged gift. Food is a favorite in this situation. And if someone gives you a gift, be sure to reciprocate with something of lesser value when you next meet.
  • On April 11, 2013
    Nicholas Coldicott answered the question: Nicholas Coldicott

    What are the best bars in Tokyo?

    Tokyo is, without question, the world’s best city for drinkers. You could pick a drink and find a bar devoted to it. (Rum? Try Tafia in Nishi Azabu. Beer? Popeye, Craft Beer Market or Goodbeer Faucets. Vodka? Go to Bloody Doll. Absinthe? Bar Trench. Sherry? Sherry Club. Whisky or wine? There are hundreds of those.)

    The Ginza district is home to the world’s most obsessive cocktail makers. They obsess about technique, move with precision, and favor classics over offbeat innovations. Star Bar, High Five, Little Smith and Mohri Bar are the cream of the crop.

    For only-in-Tokyo experiences, try Kamiya Bar, the oldest western-style bar in the capital. It serves beers with a proprietary sweet liquor called Denki Bran. Or head to Shinjuku’s Golden Gai ditrict. It’s crammed with around 250 tiny, rickety bars, some seating less than a dozen customers. Of all the choices, Albatross and La Jetee are reliable for a warm welcome. 
  • On April 11, 2013
    Nicholas Coldicott answered the question: Nicholas Coldicott

    Where is the best shopping in Tokyo?

    If you want the finest of the finest, you’ll need to go to Ginza.  Nobody takes chopsticks as seriously as Ginza Natsuno, Nowhere sells Japanese sweets as stylish as those at Higashiya. And the Big liquor shop is the place to pick up some award-winning Japanese whisky. Explore the Mitsukoshi and Matsuya department stores (and don’t miss their food-focused basements). You can pick up watches by Breguet, Omega or Longines at the Nicolas G. Hayek Center, but the best reason to go there is to check out the design: each oval shop on the first floor functions as an elevator that lifts you to the corresponding brand. Ginza is also home to a multi-story Sony showroom.

    Elsewhere, don’t miss the teen fashion mayhem of 109 in Shibuya, or the world’s most innovative upcycling shop, Omotesando’s Pass The Baton, which is packed full of one-off designer goodies and ingenious ways to rebrand factory rejects.
  • On April 9, 2013
  • On April 8, 2013
    Nicholas Coldicott answered the question: Nicholas Coldicott

    What are the best things to see and do in Tokyo?

    Tokyo is a hectic megalopolis and you won’t be stuck for things to do. But make sure these are on your list. 

    Spend
    Find out what’s really Big in Japan at a branch of RanKing RanQueen, a chain that stocks the country’s current best-selling items in all kinds of categories, from candy to cosmetics. Head to Ginza for big-brand boutiques and exquisite craftsmanship. And check out Harajuku’s backstreets for indie fashion boutiques.

    Eat
    You can’t go wrong with Tokyo’s restaurants. Chefs at every level use fresh, seasonal ingredients and take their craft seriously. Eat some ramen, visit an izakaya and head to Tsukiji fish market for a sushi breakfast.

    Climb
    The best view of the world’s most populous metropolis is from above. The Tokyo Metropolitan Government building is free and offers a 202-meter-high view from Shinjuku. The shiny new 634-meter Tokyo Sky Tree has the highest and most expensive observation deck. But Mori Tower in Roppongi is still the pick of the bunch -- it’s the only one with a world-class art museum in the middle.

    Soak
    The best hot springs are in nearby resorts such as Hakone or Atami and well worth the trip. But Tokyo has a few too. Best of the lot is Seta Onsen in western Tokyo. It has several indoor single-sex pools, saunas and massage rooms, plus two outdoor tubs where men and women (in swimwear) can soak together. If you’re lucky, the outdoor bar will be open too.
  • On March 28, 2013
  • On March 25, 2013
  • On March 25, 2013
  • On March 25, 2013
  • On March 25, 2013
    Tom Flournoy is now following Nicholas Coldicott
  • On March 25, 2013
    Hayley Bosch is now following Nicholas Coldicott
  • On March 25, 2013
    Andi Berens is now following Nicholas Coldicott
  • On March 25, 2013
  • On March 25, 2013