What is Hawaii’s cultural scene like?

Hawaii’s cultural scene is one of its biggest draws. Each year, millions of people visit to catch some of the aloha spirit. Aloha is used to say hello and goodbye but it also means love and affection. It’s a way of living in Hawaii, and a spirit that can be felt anywhere you go.

The first settlers to the islands were part of the Polynesian migration. Through the years, people came from all over the globe to work the plantations. The result is a multi-ethnic population that includes Japanese, Chinese, Filipinos, Vietnamese, Tahitians, and many others cultures. Today, Hawaii celebrates its rich history by preserving traditions from the past.

One of the main ways Hawaii celebrates its ancient culture is through hula. According to island history, hula began on Molokai when the Hawaiian goddess Laka began dancing to appease her sister, Pele, the goddess of fire. Laka, according to the lore, then traveled from island to island teaching the dance. In the years that followed, hula — which refers to movement and hand gestures — played an important role in oral tradition. The people of Hawaii combined the dance movements with chants to express everything about their lives. Every movement in hula has a specific meaning, every gesture a special significance. Despite the cultural importance of hula, it nearly became a lost art when Protestant missionaries arrived in the island in the late 1800s. Seeing only the provocative movements of the dance, the missionaries denounced hula as heathen and banned it. But Hawaiians had a cultural patron during this time in King David Kalakua, who not only encouraged hula and other local arts to continue, but is credited with their preservation. You can catch an authentic hula performance at a luau. And we have to say: Attending a luau while you’re in Hawaii is a must.

You’ll find heritage sites, natural wonders and sacred places throughout the islands. In Oahu, be sure to visit the Bishop Museum, Diamond Head State Monument and the Polynesian Cultural Center. In Maui, make a trip to Haleaklala National Park to see the sunset and endangered species. Of course, there’s Hawaii Volcanoes National Park on the Big Island. Be sure to also visit Kealakekua Bay State Historical Park on the southern Kona Coast to see where Captain Cook first arrived on the Big Island. On Kauai, you’ll want to visit Waimea Canyon State Park, which is known as the Grand Canyon of the Pacific.

  • On September 28, 2012
    Forbes Travel Guide Inspector answered the question: Forbes Travel Guide Inspector

    Where are the best places to stay in Hawaii?

    A trip to Hawaii is luxurious enough in itself thanks to the island’s wealth of natural beauty, but staying at one of the top notch full-service resorts on the island only adds to the sybaritic feel of a trip here. From family-oriented resorts to romantic bungalows, the Big Island is chock full of great places to stay. Here are our Forbes Travel Guide editors’ picks of the best places to stay in Hawaii:
     
    1. Four Seasons Resort Hualalai This Forbes Travel Guide Five-Star Big Island resort blends beautifully into its natural surroundings. From the moment you enter the soaring, open-air lobby full of exotic floral arrangements and sip the fruity rum punch offered at check-in, you’ll be in pure Hawaiian heaven. Outdoor showers, pools lined with cabanas, a Four-Star spa and a charming general store stocked with great wines and snacks make it hard to ever leave.  Charming little bungalows carved into the black lava house the spacious rooms, all of which have ocean views and private lanais.
     
    2. Hilton Waikoloa Village. With more than 1,200 rooms spread among three buildings connected by tram, boat and walkway, Hilton Waikoloa Village is, well, gigantic. But with dozens of activities right onsite, it’s also ideal for families. You’ll find three freshwater pools (two with water slides), a four-acre swimming and snorkeling lagoon, a tennis center with eight courts, a huge collection of Pacific art, and nine restaurants serving everything from sushi to family-style buffets. The only thing you’re really missing is a real beach, but the lovely Anaehoomalu Bay is just a short shuttle ride away.
     
    3. The Fairmont Orchid, Hawaii. Like all of the big chichi resorts in the area, The Fairmont Orchid has a beautiful beachfront location, oceanfront pool and miles of manicured walkways, plus a spa that offers outdoor treatments surrounded by streams and waterfalls. The traditional rooms are spacious with marble bathrooms and lanais, and everything is nice enough. It is certainly comfortable and there are all the perks of a big resort: seven bars and restaurants, and scores of activities.
     
    4. Mauna Kea Beach Hotel. Before an earthquake toppled the resort in 2006, the Mauna Kea was the resort on the island, built by Laurance S. Rockefeller in 1965. Back then, no other lodging development had taken place in this barren area covered with lava rock, but that didn’t deter Rockefeller. The rebuilt resort is open-air, including guest corridors, with pretty Hawaiian quilts framed as art adorning the walls. The rooms resemble a chic boutique hotel, with built-in furniture, crisp white beds, pops of bright colors and luxurious white glass-tiled bathrooms.
  • On September 28, 2012
    Forbes Travel Guide Inspector answered the question: Forbes Travel Guide Inspector

    Where are the best places to stay in Hawaii?

    A trip to Hawaii is luxurious enough in itself thanks to the island’s wealth of natural beauty, but staying at one of the top notch full-service resorts on the island only adds to the sybaritic feel of a trip here. From family-oriented resorts to romantic bungalows, the Big Island is chock full of great places to stay. Here are our Forbes Travel Guide editors’ picks of the best places to stay in Hawaii:
     
    1. Four Seasons Resort Hualalai This Forbes Travel Guide Five-Star Big Island resort blends beautifully into its natural surroundings. From the moment you enter the soaring, open-air lobby full of exotic floral arrangements and sip the fruity rum punch offered at check-in, you’ll be in pure Hawaiian heaven. Outdoor showers, pools lined with cabanas, a Four-Star spa and a charming general store stocked with great wines and snacks make it hard to ever leave.  Charming little bungalows carved into the black lava house the spacious rooms, all of which have ocean views and private lanais.
     
    2. Hilton Waikoloa Village. With more than 1,200 rooms spread among three buildings connected by tram, boat and walkway, Hilton Waikoloa Village is, well, gigantic. But with dozens of activities right onsite, it’s also ideal for families. You’ll find three freshwater pools (two with water slides), a four-acre swimming and snorkeling lagoon, a tennis center with eight courts, a huge collection of Pacific art, and nine restaurants serving everything from sushi to family-style buffets. The only thing you’re really missing is a real beach, but the lovely Anaehoomalu Bay is just a short shuttle ride away.
     
    3. The Fairmont Orchid, Hawaii. Like all of the big chichi resorts in the area, The Fairmont Orchid has a beautiful beachfront location, oceanfront pool and miles of manicured walkways, plus a spa that offers outdoor treatments surrounded by streams and waterfalls. The traditional rooms are spacious with marble bathrooms and lanais, and everything is nice enough. It is certainly comfortable and there are all the perks of a big resort: seven bars and restaurants, and scores of activities.
     
    4. Mauna Kea Beach Hotel. Before an earthquake toppled the resort in 2006, the Mauna Kea was the resort on the island, built by Laurance S. Rockefeller in 1965. Back then, no other lodging development had taken place in this barren area covered with lava rock, but that didn’t deter Rockefeller. The rebuilt resort is open-air, including guest corridors, with pretty Hawaiian quilts framed as art adorning the walls. The rooms resemble a chic boutique hotel, with built-in furniture, crisp white beds, pops of bright colors and luxurious white glass-tiled bathrooms.
  • On September 28, 2012
    Forbes Travel Guide Inspector answered the question: Forbes Travel Guide Inspector

    Where are the best places to stay in Hawaii?

    A trip to Hawaii is luxurious enough in itself thanks to the island’s wealth of natural beauty, but staying at one of the top notch full-service resorts on the island only adds to the sybaritic feel of a trip here. From family-oriented resorts to romantic bungalows, the Big Island is chock full of great places to stay. Here are our Forbes Travel Guide editors’ picks of the best places to stay in Hawaii:
     
    1. <a href="http://www.forbestravelguide.com/property/four-seasons-resort-hualalai-at-historic-karsquoupulehu">Four Seasons Resort Hualalai</a> This Forbes Travel Guide Five-Star Big Island resort blends beautifully into its natural surroundings. From the moment you enter the soaring, open-air lobby full of exotic floral arrangements and sip the fruity rum punch offered at check-in, you’ll be in pure Hawaiian heaven. Outdoor showers, pools lined with cabanas, a Four-Star <a href="http://www.forbestravelguide.com/property/the-spa-at-four-seasons-resort-hualalai">spa</a> and a charming general store stocked with great wines and snacks make it hard to ever leave.  Charming little bungalows carved into the black lava house the spacious rooms, all of which have ocean views and private lanais.
     
    2. Hilton Waikoloa Village. With more than 1,200 rooms spread among three buildings connected by tram, boat and walkway, Hilton Waikoloa Village is, well, gigantic. But with dozens of activities right onsite, it’s also ideal for families. You’ll find three freshwater pools (two with water slides), a four-acre swimming and snorkeling lagoon, a tennis center with eight courts, a huge collection of Pacific art, and nine restaurants serving everything from sushi to family-style buffets. The only thing you’re really missing is a real beach, but the lovely Anaehoomalu Bay is just a short shuttle ride away.
     
    3. The Fairmont Orchid, Hawaii. Like all of the big chichi resorts in the area, The Fairmont Orchid has a beautiful beachfront location, oceanfront pool and miles of manicured walkways, plus a spa that offers outdoor treatments surrounded by streams and waterfalls. The traditional rooms are spacious with marble bathrooms and lanais, and everything is nice enough. It is certainly comfortable and there are all the perks of a big resort: seven bars and restaurants, and scores of activities.
     
    4. Mauna Kea Beach Hotel. Before an earthquake toppled the resort in 2006, the Mauna Kea was the resort on the island, built by Laurance S. Rockefeller in 1965. Back then, no other lodging development had taken place in this barren area covered with lava rock, but that didn’t deter Rockefeller. The rebuilt resort is open-air, including guest corridors, with pretty Hawaiian quilts framed as art adorning the walls. The rooms resemble a chic boutique hotel, with built-in furniture, crisp white beds, pops of bright colors and luxurious white glass-tiled bathrooms.
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  • On September 28, 2012
    Forbes Travel Guide Inspector answered the question: Forbes Travel Guide Inspector

    Where are the best places to stay in Hawaii?

    A trip to Hawaii is luxurious enough in itself thanks to the island’s wealth of natural beauty, but staying at one of the top notch full-service resorts on the island only adds to the sybaritic feel of a trip here. From family-oriented resorts to romantic bungalows, the Big Island is chock full of great places to stay. Here are our Forbes Travel Guide editors’ picks of the best places to stay in Hawaii:
     
    1. <a href="http://www.forbestravelguide.com/property/four-seasons-resort-hualalai-at-historic-karsquoupulehu">Four Seasons Resort Hualalai at Historic Ka’upulehu.</a> This Forbes Travel Guide Five-Star Big Island resort blends beautifully into its natural surroundings. From the moment you enter the soaring, open-air lobby full of exotic floral arrangements and sip the fruity rum punch offered at check-in, you’ll be in pure Hawaiian heaven. Outdoor showers, pools lined with cabanas, a Four-Star <a href="http://www.forbestravelguide.com/property/the-spa-at-four-seasons-resort-hualalai">spa</a> and a charming general store stocked with great wines and snacks make it hard to ever leave.  Charming little bungalows carved into the black lava house the spacious rooms, all of which have ocean views and private lanais.
     
    2. Hilton Waikoloa Village. With more than 1,200 rooms spread among three buildings connected by tram, boat and walkway, Hilton Waikoloa Village is, well, gigantic. But with dozens of activities right onsite, it’s also ideal for families. You’ll find three freshwater pools (two with water slides), a four-acre swimming and snorkeling lagoon, a tennis center with eight courts, a huge collection of Pacific art, and nine restaurants serving everything from sushi to family-style buffets. The only thing you’re really missing is a real beach, but the lovely Anaehoomalu Bay is just a short shuttle ride away.
     
    3. The Fairmont Orchid, Hawaii. Like all of the big chichi resorts in the area, The Fairmont Orchid has a beautiful beachfront location, oceanfront pool and miles of manicured walkways, plus a spa that offers outdoor treatments surrounded by streams and waterfalls. The traditional rooms are spacious with marble bathrooms and lanais, and everything is nice enough. It is certainly comfortable and there are all the perks of a big resort: seven bars and restaurants, and scores of activities.
     
    4. Mauna Kea Beach Hotel. Before an earthquake toppled the resort in 2006, the Mauna Kea was the resort on the island, built by Laurance S. Rockefeller in 1965. Back then, no other lodging development had taken place in this barren area covered with lava rock, but that didn’t deter Rockefeller. The rebuilt resort is open-air, including guest corridors, with pretty Hawaiian quilts framed as art adorning the walls. The rooms resemble a chic boutique hotel, with built-in furniture, crisp white beds, pops of bright colors and luxurious white glass-tiled bathrooms.
  • On September 28, 2012
    Forbes Travel Guide Inspector answered the question: Forbes Travel Guide Inspector

    What’s the best time to visit Hawaii?

    The best time to visit Hawaii’s Big Island is mid to late winter. Temperatures are ideal, humpback whales are visiting, and big surf is rolling in. However, this is also the most crowded and expensive season, so solitude seekers and the budget-minded should consider late winter or early summer. But the weather is pretty much wonderful year round in Hawaii. That said, if you’re staying in Kona, you’ll likely see “vog” (smog from Kilauea) during the afternoons depending on how the wind is blowing; it burns off come evening.
     
    There is little difference between the two seasons: winter, from November to April, sees average daily highs in the upper 70s, while in summer, from May to October, temperatures climb into the mid-80s. At night, the temperature drops only about 10 degrees, thanks to warm surface waters and cool trade winds blowing down from the northern Pacific that keep temperatures mild. When the winds stop, however, hot, sticky conditions prevail.
     
    Hurricane season runs from June through November, though large storms rarely reach the any of the islands. The Big Island gets the most rainfall from November through March, although Hawaii’s many microclimates ensure that dry weather soon follows. Water temperatures average between 74 and 80 degrees. Swimmers and surfers should note that strong currents could make beaches dicier in winter. If you plan to travel into the mountains, such as the 13,796-foot Mauna Kea, during your stay, keep in mind that the sun’s rays intensify while the temperature drops (about 3.5 degrees for every 1,000 feet above sea level).
  • On September 28, 2012
    Forbes Travel Guide Inspector answered the question: Forbes Travel Guide Inspector

    What are the best things to do in Hawaii?

    A long list of incredible attractions lures million of visitors to Hawaii each year — gorgeous sandy beaches, lush tropical rain forests with brightly colored flowers, breathtakingly beautiful sea cliffs that soar thousands of feet into the sunny sky, the dreamiest of sunsets, some of the world’s best hotels, crystal-clear water that’s perfect for snorkeling and scuba diving. We could go on and on, but here are five things that you absolutely must see and do while on a visit to the Big Island:
     
    1. Explore Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. More than a million visitors a year arrive to bear witness to the tempestuous Kilauea, the world’s most active volcano. Kilauea has been erupting continuously since 1983, the volcano’s longest rift-zone eruption in more than 600 years. As lava flows down Kilauea and into the ocean, new land mass is created, making the Big Island even bigger. On some days, you can actually see the fiery lava flowing, something that is causing the island to keep growing. Must-see sites include the Holei Sea Arch, Thurston Lava Tube, Kilauea Iki Overlook and Jaggar Museum.
     
    2. Climb Mauna Kea. This dormant volcano is Hawaii’s tallest mountain and to get to the top of the 13,796-foot volcano, you’ll need a four-wheel-drive vehicle. There are plenty of companies that will take you to the summit, such as Mauna Kea Summit Adventures, and you know you’re in good hands. The journey to the summit is a seven- to eight-hour trip, where you’re rewarded with access to the world’s largest telescopes to gaze out onto the Hawaiian Islands.
     
    3. Tour the coffee plantations. Sure, Hawaii is known for its beaches; but Kona is known for its legendary coffee. Take a tour of the various coffee plantations around Kona, many of which have tasting rooms where you can sample the different roasts and take home what you like best. Don’t miss celebrating the tradition with the Kona Coffee Cultural Festival each November.
     
    4. Get a birds-eye view. Hop aboard a helicopter and take off to see Hawaii from a different point of view. The most well known company in Hawaii is Blue Hawaiian Helicopters, which offers tours of the Kohala Coast (where you’ll spot sea cliffs, valleys and ancient Hawaiian settlements), as well as flying over fiery lava flows, rain forests and waterfalls. It’s a great way to see the Big Island’s wide variety of natural attractions.
     
    5. Hit the beach. Everyone comes to Hawaii for the glorious beaches, whether it’s to just lie around under the sun, or to spend the entire day surfing or snorkeling. Which beach you choose depends on your interest — Hawaii contains some of the world’s most beautiful stretches of sand and surf.
  • On September 28, 2012
    Forbes Travel Guide Inspector answered the question: Forbes Travel Guide Inspector

    What are the five best things to see and do in Hawaii?

    A long list of incredible attractions lures million of visitors to Hawaii each year — gorgeous sandy beaches, lush tropical rain forests with brightly colored flowers, breathtakingly beautiful sea cliffs that soar thousands of feet into the sunny sky, the dreamiest of sunsets, some of the world’s best hotels, crystal-clear water that’s perfect for snorkeling and scuba diving. We could go on and on, but here are five things that you absolutely must see and do while on a visit to Hawaii:

    1. See a volcano. Climb atop a dormant volcano in Maui; watching the sunrise above Haleakala Crater is a breathtaking sight. Or see an active volcano on the Big Island. The Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park has been spewing lava since 1983, adding more than 500 acres of land to the island’s south shore. On some days, you can actually see the fiery lava flowing, something that is causing the island to keep growing.

    2. Explore the coastline. You’ll find the lush tropical landscape you expect to see while visiting Hawaii on all the islands, but for some of the most spectacular scenery, sightsee along the Na Pali Coast in Kauai. This dramatic coastline, one of Hawaii’s most beautiful, has majestic sea cliffs, fertile valleys and sensational waterfalls. The road to Hana in Maui is also a must during a visit to that island. It requires nearly a full day of driving, and is one hairpin turn after another, but the scenery is truly amazing. If you’re on Oahu, explore the North Shore. Stop for breakfast and to pick up lunch in Haleiwa and then head to the glorious beaches made famous for their waves.

    3. Snorkel in a volcanic cinder cone. Just a couple of miles off the south coast of Maui sits Molokini, a sunken crater that’s teeming with fish, making it one of Hawaii’s most popular snorkeling sites. The water is so clear that visibility can be up to 200 feet. Many companies offer snorkeling trips to this great viewing spot.

    4. Attend a luau. You can’t visit Hawaii without attending a luau. Most begin with a lei greeting and a torch-lighting ceremony followed by a large feast — Kalua pig and poi are traditional foods — and live entertainment, which often includes hula dancing. Many hotels host regular luaus.

    5. Hit the beach. Everyone comes to Hawaii for the glorious beaches, whether it’s to just lie around under the sun, or to spend the entire day surfing or snorkeling. Which beach you choose depends on your interest — Hawaii contains some of the world’s most beautiful stretches of sand and surf.
  • On September 28, 2012
    Forbes Travel Guide Inspector answered the question: Forbes Travel Guide Inspector

    What are the five best things to do with kids in Hawaii?

    Hawaii may conjure images of romantic luaus by the beach, but you’ll find a lot of things to do with the kids, too. Hilton Waikoloa Village on the Big Island has a program where you can swim with the dolphins; Grand Wailea Resort Hotel & Spa on Maui has nine pools, which include slides, caves, rapids and waterfalls; Grand Hyatt on Kauai has a great camp; and each of the Four Seasons resorts throughout the islands also has great kids programs. With so many kid-friendly resorts, it’s easy to plan a family trip to Hawaii. So bring the kids and check out these great things to do:

    1. View one of the most active volcanoes on earth. The Big Island is home to Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, where you can still see the lava spewing from Kilauea. The park serves as the primary motivation for traveling to the Big Island. Kilauea has been erupting continuously since 1983. You can explain to your kids how new land mass is created. (Hint: As lava flows down Kilauea and into the ocean, the Big Island grows.)

    2. Head to the beach. There are kid-friendly beaches on every island: Hapuna State Recreation Area on the Big Island; Poipu Beach Park in Kauai; Hulopoe Beach on Lanai; Kapalua Beach Park on Maui; Murphy’s Beach Park in Molokai; and Waimea Beach Park on Oahu (just be sure to visit this North Shore spot in summer; the waves in winter can be up to 50 feet high).

    3. See Waimea Canyon. Take the kids to see the “Grand Canyon of the Pacific.” Located on the southwest side of Kauai, the canyon stretches 14 miles and is more than 3,600 feet deep.

    4. Go underwater. Explore the depths of the Pacific Ocean in a high-tech submarine. Sink down 100 feet into the deep blue sea. Atlantic Adventures has been offering submarine tours on Oahu, Maui and the Big Island for decades. Who knows what will swim by — perhaps a shark or two, some stingrays or a school of parrotfish.

    5. Learn about the culture. With its multiple villages, each depicting life on one of the Polynesian islands, the Polynesian Cultural Center on Oahu is fun and educational for the whole family. People from these islands demonstrate ancient practices such as coconut cracking and spear tossing. Learn how to start a fire, climb a tree and cook the Samoan way. In addition to the seven villages and an Easter Island exhibit, there are live shows and an IMAX theater showing ocean-related films on its giant screen.
  • On September 28, 2012
    Forbes Travel Guide Inspector answered the question: Forbes Travel Guide Inspector

    Where is the best Hawaii shopping?

    The best shopping in Hawaii can be found in the upscale stores located in Honolulu and Maui, as well as in the bustling marketplaces found throughout the islands. Shop for designer goods, buy some Hawaiian shirts, and stock up on gifts to take back home. You’ll find all this and more at these five shopping destinations:

    1. Ala Moana Center in Honolulu. Within walking distance of most Waikiki hotels, this tri-level 290-store open-air mall includes stores in every price range, from the Gap to Prada. You’ll also find banks, a post office, a couple of drugstores and a wide variety of restaurants. Plenty of stores here, such as the island-wide chains Hilo Hattie and Crazy Shirts, stock Hawaiian souvenirs. There’s also a Reyn’s, which is where locals go for the popular “reverse print” fabrics.

    2. Luxury Row in Honolulu. A select group of high-end boutiques on Kalakaua Avenue in Waikiki carry some of the world’s finest French, American and Italian designer clothing and accessories. The quaint townhouse look of this upscale outdoor mall incorporates lava rock, limestone and bronze into the architecture and provides an elegant showcase for flagship stores of Chanel, Gucci, Tiffany & Co. and Yves Saint Laurent.

    3. The Shops at Wailea in Maui. This smart collection of shops includes Louis Vuitton, Gucci, Folli Follie, Bottega Veneta and other high-end stores, as well as more reasonably priced options including Gap, Tommy Bahama, T-shirt Factory and several locally owned boutiques and specialty shops.

    4. Kapaa Town. When you want to do some shopping on Kauai, hit the main drag through this charming old town. You’ll find a wide assortment of funky shops and specialty stores with hard-to-resist merchandise, so it’s unlikely you’ll head back to your car empty-handed. Asian-influenced accessories for your home, handmade glass decorative pieces, woodcarvings, aloha shirts and handmade jewelry are a sampling of the goods that independent retailers sell along this colorful shopping strip.

    5. Hilo Farmers’ Market. Every Wednesday and Saturday since 1988, island vendors have been gathering at this outdoor market on the Big Island to sell fresh produce, crafts, gifts and tropical flowers. Over the years, the market has grown from a handful of vendors to more than 200. You’ll find everything from bitter melon and jackfruit to bongo drums and puka shell anklets.
  • On September 28, 2012
    Forbes Travel Guide Inspector answered the question: Forbes Travel Guide Inspector

    What are the five best things to do on a romantic trip to Hawaii?

    There are so many things that make Hawaii a great romantic trip — from the gorgeous sunsets to the island breezes to the aloha spirit, it’s easy to see why Hawaii is one of the top honeymoon destinations. Our picks for the five most romantic things to do:

    1. Go horseback riding. You can do this pretty much anywhere in Hawaii but one of our favorite spots is on Lanai along the Paniolo Trail. The Stables at Koele offer great facilities and an expert staff. You’ll pass through groves of sweet-smelling guava and ironwood trees, and experience scenic views of Molokai and Maui. Carriage rides are also available. Afterward, we recommend an oceanside couples massage at Four Seasons Resort Lanai at Manele Bay. The secluded setting right on the bay is idyllic. Cabanas are set up right next to the water for this reason.

    2. Take a helicopter ride. One of the best — and most romantic — ways to see the islands is from the air. Get a view of Kilauea, the active volcano on the Big Island, or explore the Na Pali coast in Kauai sitting side by side on a chopper — totally thrilling and romantic.

    3. Watch the sunrise. The best spot to do this is on Haleakala on the island of Maui. In the early morning hours, many sleepy-eyed folks huddle in the park’s chilly high altitude to watch a spectacular sunrise.

    4. Sail along the Na Pali coast. Another great way to see Kauai’s famous coastline with its emerald green sea cliffs is from the water. Boat tours depart from Port Allen.

    5. Pack a picnic and swim under a waterfall. You don’t have to go very far in Hawaii to find a beautiful waterfall — along the road to Hana in Maui, the Manoa Falls Trail in Oahu, the Na Pali coast in Kauai, and many other places. A lot of restaurants also sell a picnic lunch.
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