What are the five best things to see and do in New Brunswick?

As the largest of Canada’s three Maritime Provinces, New Brunswick is bursting with the pride and color of the Acadian French (Cajuns’ northern cousins). It’s rich historic past and stunning natural attractions make this bilingual province full of great things to see and do. Here’s our list of the five things you can’t miss in New Brunswick:

Hopewell Rocks. Located on the shore of the Bay of Fundy, these unique cliffs, caves and flowerpot-shaped pillars are made of dark sedimentary conglomerate and sandstone rock. During low tide you can see these fantastic formations from ground level; but even during high tide, the cliffs are still beautiful.

Saint John Reversing Falls. Watch these waters defy gravity as the St. John River changes directions. Of course, there’s a logical explanation for this: As the tides of the Bay of Fundy rise and fall, they cause the water of the river to change direction of its flow.

Shediac Lobster Festival. The town of Shediac hosts five days of fantastic seafood and world-class entertainment in early July. Established in 1949, the Shediac Lobster Festival draws visitors from all over the world to feast on succulent lobster and soak up Acadian and maritime culture.

Fundy National Park. On the coast between Saint John and Moncton sits an extraordinary parcel of land - 80 square miles of forested hills and valleys crisscrossed by miles of hiking trails. Cliffs front much of the rugged coastline, home of the highest tides in the world. To view this phenomenon, visit the beaches at Herring Cove, Point Wolfe and the picturesque town of Alma.

Kings Landing Historical Settlement. From June to early October, explore what this living museum has to offer. The settlement of 70 buildings is a representation of New Brunswick during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Though it does not depict a specific town, the village is a collection of salvaged or recreated buildings from around the province. With “settlers” dressed in 19th-century garb, you can get the gist of what New Brunswick was like back then.

  • On September 19, 2012
    Forbes Travel Guide Inspector answered the question: Forbes Travel Guide Inspector

    What should I pack for a trip to New Brunswick?

    As one of the most picturesque provinces in Canada, New Brunswick has plenty to see and do — but it requires just a few vital things on your packing list. Here’s what you shouldn’t go without:

    1. Camera. You’ll want to capture those scenic moments. Whether it’s of a whale tail during a boat tour or a covered bridge you cross during a drive, the photo ops are endless. And though your camera on your cell phone will work, you’ll want to blow these pictures up so you can admire the brilliant colors present throughout New Brunswick.

    2. Layers. As a Maritime Province, days can be extremely warm, while the nights dip down into sweater weather. It’s always a safe bet to bring layers no matter what your plans are. Remember, out on the bay, it can get pretty chilly even if it’s hot on land.

    3. Swimsuit. During the summer, New Brunswick has the warmest saltwater north of Virginia. Translation: great swimming. With tons of beaches scattered along the coast, yo’ll find it hard to believe that you are so far north.
  • On November 12, 2011
    Forbes Travel Guide Inspector answered the question: Forbes Travel Guide Inspector

    What are the best places to stay in New Brunswick?

    With adorable towns come adorable accommodations, and this is certainly the case in New Brunswick. Though much of the province is wide-open space, the coastal towns are home to a couple of these charming and luxurious hotels. Here are a couple of our favorites:

    1. Kingsbrae Arms. Housed in a circa-1897 country house, this intimate inn overlooks the breathtaking Passamaquoddy Bay. Nearby are a renowned golf course, art galleries and the old town of St. Andrews. Though it is only open for the summer months, Kingsbrae Arms is worth the trip. Each suite has a gas fireplace, marble bathroom and a separate living room. The restaurant is popular with locals and visitors alike, thanks to its focus on fresh, seasonal and local food, particularly seafood. Settle in for a pre-determined menu of several courses, and enjoy a bottle from the award-winning cellar.

    2. The Fairmont Algonquin. This seaside resort overlooks Passamaquoddy Bay, with an area of tidal changes that varies 28 feet between the high and low tides. Guestrooms feature period décor in the main historic building and a more contemporary style in the 1993 Prince of Wales wing. The four-floor rooms, originally the servants’ quarters, offer the best views of the bay and surrounding countryside.
  • On November 12, 2011
    Forbes Travel Guide Inspector answered the question: Forbes Travel Guide Inspector

    What are the five best things to do on a romantic trip to New Brunswick?

    Being a Maritime Province, New Brunswick offers beautiful scenery overflowing with romantic activities throughout the year. It’s the largest of Canada’s three Maritime Provinces, so the options are endless. Here’s our list of the five best things to do on a romantic trip to New Brunswick:

    Whale Watching. Venture out into the Bay of Fundy and experience the best whale watching on the East Coast. In the Fundy Coastal Drive region of the province, you’ll find plenty of tour companies that will provide you with a trip of a lifetime.
    Kingsbrae Garden. Stroll the 27 acres of beautiful walking trails through the gardens hand-in-hand. You’ll pass by more than 50,000 flowers, shrubs and other plants. Let your senses revel in the romantic scents through the themed gardens. They’re only open May through October, but if you happen to be in town then, they’re worth the trip.
    Ministers Island. Grab a tour guide and set out from St. Andrews during low tide for an unbelievable drive on the ocean floor. Once you arrive at the island, visit the historic summer home of Sir William Van Horne, the man behind the building of the Canadian Pacific Railway that unified the country coast to coast.
    Dinner at Kingsbrae Arms. Though it’s only open for the summer, which is the case for much of this region, dinner at this coastal paradise is one to remember. Concentrating on fresh ingredients from local farms and fisheries, the menu is pleasing to the eye and stomach. It doesn’t get much more romantic than a cozy dinner overlooking the Passamaquoddy Bay.
    Explore the Covered Bridges. New Brunswick is spotted with 60 covered bridges that bring you back to the days of yore. With the region’s stunning scenery, just about every one of these bridges is a romantic sight. We love the Canal Covered Bridge near St. George.
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  • On November 12, 2011
    Forbes Travel Guide Inspector answered the question: Forbes Travel Guide Inspector

    What are the five best things to see and do in New Brunswick?

    As the largest of Canada’s three Maritime Provinces, New Brunswick is bursting with the pride and color of the Acadian French (Cajuns’ northern cousins). It’s rich historic past and stunning natural attractions make this bilingual province full of great things to see and do. Here’s our list of the five things you can’t miss in New Brunswick:

    Hopewell Rocks. Located on the shore of the Bay of Fundy, these unique cliffs, caves and flowerpot-shaped pillars are made of dark sedimentary conglomerate and sandstone rock. During low tide you can see these fantastic formations from ground level; but even during high tide, the cliffs are still beautiful.
    Saint John Reversing Falls. Watch these waters defy gravity as the St. John River changes directions. Of course, there’s a logical explanation for this: As the tides of the Bay of Fundy rise and fall, they cause the water of the river to change direction of its flow.
    Shediac Lobster Festival. The town of Shediac hosts five days of fantastic seafood and world-class entertainment in early July. Established in 1949, the Shediac Lobster Festival draws visitors from all over the world to feast on succulent lobster and soak up Acadian and maritime culture.
    Fundy National Park. On the coast between Saint John and Moncton sits an extraordinary parcel of land - 80 square miles of forested hills and valleys crisscrossed by miles of hiking trails. Cliffs front much of the rugged coastline, home of the highest tides in the world. To view this phenomenon, visit the beaches at Herring Cove, Point Wolfe and the picturesque town of Alma.
    Kings Landing Historical Settlement. From June to early October, explore what this living museum has to offer. The settlement of 70 buildings is a representation of New Brunswick during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Though it does not depict a specific town, the village is a collection of salvaged or recreated buildings from around the province. With “settlers” dressed in 19th-century garb, you can get the gist of what New Brunswick was like back then.
  • On November 11, 2011
    Forbes Travel Guide Inspector answered the question: Forbes Travel Guide Inspector

    What is the best time to visit New Brunswick?

    If you really want to experience New Brunswick at its best, plan a trip in the fall. With what is widely considered the best whale watching on the East Coast, the Bay of Fundy is brimming with friendly giants waiting to be seen. And what a sight it is. If whale watching isn’t for you, don’t rule out fall just yet. As the traditional harvest season, the autumn in New Brunswick is beautiful. The brilliant foliage is absolutely picturesque and what we think is the best in the country. Though some towns tend to shut down following the summer months, the scenery of this Maritime Province is stunning in the fall months. Considering New Brunswick doesn’t have as many activities as some the other provinces, it’s the scenery that really gets us back here.