What are the best things to eat in Puebla?

A city steeped in a rich (and delicious) culinary heritage, Puebla’s dining options are almost as varied as the colorful hues that adorn the surrounding buildings.

You simply cannot visit Puebla without trying some of its famed mole poblano. This rich, thick, chili-chocolate sauce, typically served with rice and meat, is the national dish of Mexico, and where better to try this delicacy than in its birthplace? Any of the local eateries will be sure to have its version on the menu.

For the most authentic quesadilla you can eat, head for the city’s covered food market, Mercado de Cholula. Skip the taquerias and make a beeline for one of the quesadillerias near the back. The oblong, purple corn tortillas here are stuffed with gooey white cheese, zucchini blossoms, local huitlacoche (a mushroom that grows on corn) and flecks of crispy chicharrón (fried pork skin) for a savory bite that can’t be beat.

Nearby stands sell fresh pico de gallo and refreshing juices to pair with your cheesy treat.

In addition to savory delights, Puebla is also known for its sweet treats. For a sugary sampling, make your way to La Calle de Santa Clara, also known locally as Calle de los Dulces (“Sweet Street”). Though you’ll be swayed in a number of directions once you get there, be sure to try some of the region’s most authentic candies like camote (candied yams), muégano (fried dough balls stuck together with syrup) and las tortitas de Santa Clara (Puebla’s local sugar cookie).

  • On July 3
    Forbes Travel Guide Inspector answered the question: Forbes Travel Guide Inspector

    What are the best things to eat in Puebla?

    A city steeped in a rich (and delicious) culinary heritage, Puebla’s dining options are almost as varied as the colorful hues that adorn the surrounding buildings.

    You simply cannot visit Puebla without trying some of its famed mole poblano. This rich, thick, chili-chocolate sauce, typically served with rice and meat, is the national dish of Mexico, and where better to try this delicacy than in its birthplace? Any of the local eateries will be sure to have its version on the menu.

    For the most authentic quesadilla you can eat, head for the city’s covered food market, Mercado de Cholula. Skip the taquerias and make a beeline for one of the quesadillerias near the back. The oblong, purple corn tortillas here are stuffed with gooey white cheese, zucchini blossoms, local huitlacoche (a mushroom that grows on corn) and flecks of crispy chicharrón (fried pork skin) for a savory bite that can’t be beat.

    Nearby stands sell fresh pico de gallo and refreshing juices to pair with your cheesy treat.

    In addition to savory delights, Puebla is also known for its sweet treats. For a sugary sampling, make your way to La Calle de Santa Clara, also known locally as Calle de los Dulces (“Sweet Street”). Though you’ll be swayed in a number of directions once you get there, be sure to try some of the region’s most authentic candies like camote (candied yams), muégano (fried dough balls stuck together with syrup) and las tortitas de Santa Clara (Puebla’s local sugar cookie).
  • On July 3
    Forbes Travel Guide Inspector answered the question: Forbes Travel Guide Inspector

    What are the best things to eat in Puebla?

    A city steeped in a rich (and delicious) culinary heritage, Puebla’s dining options are almost as varied as the colorful hues that adorn the surrounding buildings.

    You simply cannot visit Puebla without trying some of its famed mole poblano. This rich, thick, chili-chocolate sauce, typically served with rice and meat, is the national dish of Mexico, and where better to try this delicacy than in its birthplace? Any of the local eateries will be sure to have its version on the menu.

    For the most authentic quesadilla you can eat, head for the city’s covered food market, Mercado de Cholula. Skip the taquerias and make a beeline for one of the quesadillerias near the back. The oblong, purple corn tortillas here are stuffed with gooey white cheese, zucchini blossoms, local huitlacoche (a mushroom that grows on corn) and flecks of crispy chicharrón (fried pork skin) for a savory bite that can’t be beat.

    Nearby stands sell fresh pico de gallo and refreshing juices to pair with your cheesy treat.

    In addition to savory delights, Puebla is also known for its sweet treats. For a sugary sampling, make your way to La Calle de Santa Clara, also known locally as Calle de los Dulces (“Sweet Street”). Though you’ll be swayed in a number of directions once you get there, be sure to try some of the region’s most authentic candies like camote (candied yams), muégano (fried dough balls stuck together with syrup) and las tortitas de Santa Clara (Puebla’s local sugar cookie).
  • On July 3
    Forbes Travel Guide Inspector answered the question: Forbes Travel Guide Inspector

    What are the best things to eat in Puebla?

    A city steeped in a rich (and delicious) culinary heritage, Puebla’s dining options are almost as varied as the colorful hues that adorn the surrounding buildings.

    You simply cannot visit Puebla without trying some of its famed mole poblano. This rich, thick, chili-chocolate sauce, typically served with rice and meat, is the national dish of Mexico, and where better to try this delicacy than in its birthplace? Any of the local eateries will be sure to have its version on the menu.

    For the most authentic quesadilla you can eat, head for the city’s covered food market, Mercado de Cholula. Skip the taquerias and make a beeline for one of the quesadillerias near the back. The oblong, purple corn tortillas here are stuffed with gooey white cheese, zucchini blossoms, local huitlacoche (a mushroom that grows on corn) and flecks of crispy chicharrón (fried pork skin) for a savory bite that can’t be beat.

    Nearby stands sell fresh pico de gallo and refreshing juices to pair with your cheesy treat.

    In addition to savory delights, Puebla is also known for its sweet treats. For a sugary sampling, make your way to La Calle de Santa Clara, also known locally as Calle de los Dulces (“Sweet Street”). Though you’ll be swayed in a number of directions once you get there, be sure to try some of the region’s most authentic candies like camote (candied yams), muégano (fried dough balls stuck together with syrup) and las tortitas de Santa Clara (Puebla’s local sugar cookie).